Whole Foods Medical Wellness Center

As a company whose core value is to nourish people and the planet, Whole Foods sure does it right by starting with s keeping their employees healthy and looking after their wellness.

“At the WFM Medical and Wellness Centers, we strive to take you from sick to healthy, happy and thriving – and help keep you there for the rest of your life! We hope you will join us on our journey toward creating a healthier community and a new way of treating people through the highest quality, personalized health care available.” – John Mackey, Co-Founder & CEO Whole Foods Market

The company runs two medical centers in Glendale, CA and Austin, TX serving employees and their families.

“The Medical and Wellness Center provides primary care medical services, administered by physicians with a patient-centered approach. The Medical and Wellness Center not only helps patients with common illnesses and more significant medical conditions, but also provides personalized prevention and proactive care that helps people live their best and most healthy lives.”

Why it’s hot: staying true to its core value and acting on it.

Source: Harvard Business Review and https://www.wfmmedical.com/about-us

Have Amazon and Walmart met their match?

German discounter Aldi is betting billions it can win over American shoppers. How? By offering them way fewer choices than rival retailers.


The unlikely proposition has worked nearly everywhere Aldi has set foot. The company is now one of the biggest retail groups in the world with more than 10,000 locations, businesses in 18 countries and annual revenues approaching €70/$83 billion.

The American grocery market, one of the largest and most competitive in the world, is on the cusp of dramatic change since Amazon.com Inc. acquired Whole Foods Market Inc. this summer and Google struck a partnership with Wal-Mart.

But the Germans have a plan, forged in the rubble of World War II. Aldi offers a deliberately pared-down selection – most stores stock between 1,300 and 1,600 items. By comparison, Wal-Mart’s Supercenters have in recent years carried around 120,000 items. On a basket of 30 typical household items, Aldi’s prices are on average almost 17% lower than Wal-Mart’s.

Aldi is gambling it is more in tune with the American tastes, rolling out small, nimble stores instead of sprawling warehouses and supermarkets that take longer to navigate.

Why It’s Hot
It’s another example of how major players are betting on simplicity, standardization and speed. And a reason to pause and consider the trade off between choice and control versus convenience and ease.

Inside Whole Foods’ Store of the Future Tackles sustainability with digital displays


Whole Foods Market launched its first national advertising campaign last week that will focus on quality and value. The 35-year-old specialty grocer is emphasizing its importance on sustainability. They have also launched digital displays that entertain and educate their shoppers at the flagship store in Alpharetta, GA.

Why It’s Hot

Whole Foods’ tech-savvy spin on shopping is the latest effort by a grocer to differentiate itself in an increasingly competitive market. The most eye-catching activation is in the store’s café. A digital screen on a wall runs an Instagram feed showing produce still growing in the fields of six local farms that supply the store. Also in the store, a digital mirror encourages shoppers to strike three different poses, which trigger images of recommended health products like vitamins and protein shakes. Finally, touchscreens are built into display crates in the specialty section where beer, cheese and wine are sold.

This new “Values matter” advertising campaign is aimed at all its customers that are health-conscious and want to know more about where their food is sourced from – something the company says it has done for decades, just not in advertising. With plans to expand to 1,200 stores, Whole Foods wanted to introduce its brand more broadly to consumers.
The retailer posted 21 of the commercials on their YouTube channel, ranging from a new anthem commercial to others focusing on produce, meat, the global bee population decline and the retailer’s local producer loan program.