Monetize Web Traffic By Using It To Mine BitCoins

The Pirate Bay, a torrent website, experimented with getting site visitors to mine the cryptocurrency Monero with their browser over the weekend, without their knowledge.

The experiment was implemented to see if web traffic along with some code could in fact mine for bitcoins and to ultimately replace Pirate’s Bay banner ads. Upon discovering the surreptitious mining, people were understandably upset: Cryptocurrency mining can slow down your computer.

The service in question is Coin Hive and it allows users to embed JavaScript miners in their website as a side source of revenue, so the service in itself is not bad or evil. The problem with The Pirate Bay is that they have introduced the JavaScript code of the miner without letting any of the visitors know, so people started noticing that when they open the website their CPU load skyrockets and were obviously concerned.

Why It’s Hot:

As more and more ad-blockers are downloaded sites will continue to look for technology that can help them monetize with very little ask from the consumer. If more sites are more transparent with users about lending their CPU energy to mine bitcoins, then users might be willing to make the trade. The user will receive no ads and the publisher will receive revenue. A positive trade-off for both parties.

Retailers are tailoring their Web sites and promotions for you. Just you.

barneys

After years of using customer data to fine-tune their marketing efforts to smaller and smaller groups, retailers are now making a massive and expensive effort to tailor their Web sites and promotions for an even narrower target: an audience of one. Retailers and experts say the industry is in the early stages of a push toward personalization, in which individual shoppers have different experiences on retailers’ websites and receive highly customized e-mails, coupons and special offers. The technology retailers are using now is much more sophisticated: They are studying a wider range of activities — not just the last Web sites you visited — but also whether you opened or clicked on their emails, read a company blog post or previously redeemed a certain kind of coupon.

Why It’s Hot

In March, Barneys rolled out a new website in which nearly every page —the homepage, category pages and individual product pages — feature personalized content that is served up based on data from both a shopper’s in-store purchasing and online browsing behavior. “For one million users, we want to have one million different site experiences,” said Matthew Woolsey, Barneys’s executive vice president for digital.

This combined analysis of in-store and online patterns is particularly leading edge, industry experts said, as many retailers are still struggling to funnel these data sets together. The unified data can have powerful results. For example, Barneys has learned that many of the women who buy fine jewelry in its stores have previously browsed for it online. If Barneys purely looked at these shoppers’ web browsing history, Woolsey said they might deduce, “She’s never buying anything, so let’s try something else.” In fact, by looking at this shopper’s behavior across channels, Barneys learns it is indeed valuable to keep showing her digital jewelry lookbooks: She’s interested in the products, she’s just closing the deal in person.

Some retailers, such as CVS, are also paying attention to what you’re not buying at their stores. CVS’s personalization efforts are centered around its ExtraCare program, which was used by more than 90.8 million households in the last year. Even if you haven’t bought vitamins or toothpaste at their store, their data might still determine you’re a good candidate for a coupon for those products.

Retailers are now experimenting with this personalized, digital experience and discovering the potential of this technology.