Get paid to drink Pepsi (and eat Fritos)…

Pepsi is launching a PepCoin loyalty program that rewards you for buying both a single-serve beverage and a Frito-Lay snack by sending money to PayPal and Venmo accounts. If you scan enough codes on bottles and bags, you’ll receive a little bit of cash. You’ll have to earn $2 before it goes to your account, but this is real spending money.

How it works:

  • Buy a PepsiCo beverage and Frito-Lay snack.
  • Scan the codes on the bag and under the bottle cap with your phone.
  • Link the program to your PayPal or Venmo.
  • Once you accumulate $2, the money automatically transfers to your account with Venmo or PayPal.

It’s not a dollar for dollar point system, each transaction earns a person about 37 cents. So, like, 5.4 purchases.

Why it’s hot: Companies with multiple brands are increasingly using loyalty programs as a vehicle to sell across their portfolio and drive awareness of the many different products within it. With the exception of credit and debit cards, that apply cash back as a credit to your account, cash back incentives in the form of actual cash have yet to be tested (as far as I could tell). Truly successful loyalty programs thrive on creating engaging experiences and emotional connections with their consumers — it’ll be interesting to see whether Pepcoin will be able to establish a true connection with customers, past the initial shock and enroll stage and whether it’ll change how loyalty and rewards programs provide benefits to consumers in the future.

Sources: Engadget, Thrillist, MediaPostPYMNTS.com, Pepcoin, Pepsi press release

Nature vs Technology

In an age where the world has gone almost completely digital, granola brand Nature Valley wants its consumers to #RediscoverNature. In their latest advertisement they ask three different generations what they did for fun as children and this created quite the storm on their YouTube channel.

In the beginning of the video we get to hear the grandparents speak about the different things they played growing up. This was a technology less era where nature played a huge role. Some spoke of blueberry picking and fishing  Then the parents give their account that also uses nature as the background like playing hide and seek and baseball.

When its the children’s turn to describe what they do to have fun the answers were a stark contrast from what their seniors experienced. The children talk about technology and how it is the center of most their free time. One boy said that when he plays video games it feels as though no else is around, he is just in the game. One girl even said she would die without her tablet and states that she usually is on it from 3-4 hours a day.

The point of view that Nature Valley made that this generation doesn’t understand nature and the idea of playing outside and that technology is slowly taking us away from off line fun has been a real decisive line and many of the comments on YouTube have expressed this sentiment.

Why its Hot?

Working in the digital space sometimes it raises the question are we too digital?

 

 

 

From Grocery List to Packing List: How One Airline Got Consumers to Buy Their Holiday Ticket from a Snack Bag

In a clever creative stunt to distinguish itself from other airlines (who typically rely on online bookings), Transavia decided to take the process of ordering tickets offline and into the aisles of grocery stores and vending machines.

The tickets come in three varieties: gummy bears, potato chips, and cereal bars, each corresponding to one of three destinations – a bag of gummy bears will take you to Lisbon, potato chips will fly you to Barcelona, and the cereal bar can whisk you away to Dublin.

With the purchase of any of these snacks, a quick scan of the QR code to take you to the booking page, and a special discount voucher on the inside of the packaging, it aims to portray the idea that Transavia’s plane tickets are so cheap (and easy to book!), it’s like buying a bag of snacks.

Why It’s Hot:

There seems to be a clutter of different budget airlines all competing to get travelers to use them. This may especially be true in Europe, where there are airlines like RyanAir that may feel like a bus in the sky but can fly across Europe in (sometimes) under 100 Euros. This campaign is a perfect way to disrupt that sea of sameness in airline marketing techniques. By venturing out into a territory that has never been advertised on, it creates a very surprising and innovative idea to bring this brand into the minds of consumers when they are least expecting it – in the grocery store, while conducting an average everyday task.

The best part is that most airplane tickets are booked by consumers actively seeking out the discounts, whether through codes that they find online or deals through emails, but this campaign flips that old traditional way of thinking completely on its side. It offers a new way to convince someone, who may have not even been thinking of traveling, to indulge on a new adventure somewhere for very cheap.

Read more here.