Hefty makes a brawny claim about reducing waste

One of the biggest challenges when it comes to recycling and reducing waste is in educating people on what it is, why it matters, and how to do it, all while not boring people to death about it, or coming off as preachy. Hefty takes on that messaging hurdle with a little humor and smartly keeps the details vague.

Another issue with marketing a brand’s waste reduction is in equating it to something people can understand. How do you wrap your head around the fact that globally we produced 275 million metric tons of plastic waste in 2010! You can’t. People need a frame of reference to understand these abstract numbers, and this campaign does that with the help of a somewhat goofy strongman pulling a passenger jet, which represents the weight of the plastics that Hefty has managed to reclaim.

Once interest is piqued, people are taken to a micro-site that explains in more detail Hefty’s sustainability efforts: Hefty Sustainability.com

And what they’re doing is actually pretty cool and innovative. They have created a special bag in which to put hard-to-recycle plastics (those that are not accepted by most residential recycling programs) such as plastic food packaging, straws, candy wrappers, etc., which would otherwise most certainly end up in a landfill, in a tree, or choking the windpipe of a seabird.

Why it’s hot:

1. It doesn’t require you to identify as “green” in order to get it: A lot of “sustainable” brands lean into the lifestyle of the eco-conscious in their messaging, but that can turn off a lot of people who don’t identify that way. For a nationwide brand like Hefty, it makes more sense to stay away from identity and focus on their product and accomplishments.

2. It’s not much of an accomplishment actually, but it’s a start, and it’s backed up by action: Given the fact that more than 8 million tons of plastic are dumped into our oceans every year, a well-informed consumer might scoff at Hefty’s accomplishment of converting one measly airliner’s worth of hard-to-recycle plastic into new materials. But they have a model that helps collect plastics that you can’t normally recycle, and uses their product in a way people are already using it to do so.

3. Mining trash is actually a way to generate revenue: This is a mostly untapped market for raw materials, which is essentially TerraCycle’s business model, of gathering material others can’t (or won’t) and reselling it, which had it earning $20+ million in revenue in 2018.

Source: Marketing Dive

H&M and Lyft Partner to Help People Recycle

This week, New Yorkers can use Lyft for a free ride to H&M. The partnership is meant to encourage people to participate in H&M’s Garment Collecting program–a global initiative where customers can drop off clothing from any brand to their local H&M, and H&M sends it to the nearest recycling plant for reuse. Every bag of clothing dropped off earns a 15% off discount at H&M .

All customers will have to do is enter the code HMRECYCLES to claim their free Lyft ride, up to $10.

The press release announcing the partnership highlights how both companies have committed to help the environment:

  • Since the Garment Collecting program started in 2013, H&M has collected 163 pounds of textiles globally
  • In 2018, Lyft committed to offsetting their carbon emissions, ensuring every Lyft ride in NYC is carbon-neutral

Why It’s Hot

Both companies are getting at their target customers’ affinity for eco-conscious brands, while helping prevent clothing from ending up in landfills.

Source: https://www.retaildive.com/news/hm-lyft-give-rides-to-customers-recycling-old-clothes/546629/

Plastic Measures

Plastic is one of the most abundant man-made materials found on earth. With over 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic recorded in 2017, it’s safe to say that it’s a massive problem. Bottles and bags are spearheading this problem. When purchasing a water bottle it’s evident that there are some ridiculously priced products in the market but a common misconception is “because of the brand name”, though that plays a part in the price, the cost pertains mostly to the plastic, not the actual water (how shocking).

Image result for plastic pollution

Evian, noticing this issue, is taking the first step forward and has pledged that by 2025 all of their bottles will be made from 100% recycled plastic. Eliminating the use of plastic overall would be best case scenario but this is still a righteous move. National Geographic states, “every year another 350 million tons of new plastic is created but only a tiny percentage is ever recycled.” A breakthrough came from Loop Industries’ founder Daniel Solomita who wanted “to find a way to take all of the world’s PET plastic – the most common kind of plastic”. Loop has found “a unique catalyst that breaks down PET plastic with zero heat and zero pressure” this monumental discovery is incremental to the future of recycling plastic due to the fact that the only two methods of recycling plastic at the moment utilize high heat and intense pressure.

Additionally, “This zero energy depolymerization is what allows Loop Industries to do what nobody else can do—recycle any size, shape and color of PET plastic waste into virgin-quality PET plastic resin on an industrial scale.”

Why it’s hot:
It’s so hot that it’s super cool. It really takes the pressure off of traditional methods and because the main focus is to keep the technology as simple as possible for simpler implementation and distribution no one has to take the heat. This is super exciting because this is an absolutely smashing step towards sustainability and guilt-free plastic. Now when you see a plastic bag drifting through the wind, you know it’s on its way to start again.

Source: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/06/sponsor-content-revolution-plastic-recycling/ 

New Zealand brewery turns bottles into sand

“Two thirds of the world’s beaches are retreating as people across the world use non-renewable beach sand for construction, roading and other uses,” Simon Smith, brand PR and digital manager for DB Breweries, told Digital Trends. “We had some [conversations] over beers, and came up with an idea to crush glass bottles into a sand substitute that can be used in things such as construction, roading, even golf bunkers; meaning that we can keep our beautiful beach sand where it belongs: on our beaches.”
DB Breweries has built several machines able to take empty bottles and turn them into substitute sand. All a drinker needs to do is deposit his or her bottle in the machine, which then uses miniature steel hammers to crush it into 200 grams of sand in only five seconds — after extracting the plastic labels with a vacuum system.

The ultimate goal is to provide a way of prompting people to recycle by giving them an image of what exactly it means to do so, rather than leaving it as an abstraction. “Our ambition for the campaign is for people to have something tangible to think about, such as the love of our beautiful beaches, as a reminder to recycle”

Source: Digital Trends

Why it’s Hot

Back to beer coverage, hooray! Also, I posed recently about a grocery brand using its own waste to power its trucks, and I think this is another example of brand innovating to reduce their footprint.

Swedish McDonald’s Let’s You Pay for Burgers in Cans

How do you get young people to care about recycling? Free burgers couldn’t hurt.

DDB Stockholm and McDonald’s collaborated on a campaign in Sweden which allows customers to pay for hamburgers, cheeseburgers and even Big Macs with recycled cans. Billboards placed around Stockholm announce the campaign with a roll of plastic bags that can be used to collect cans for recycling. Each bag also explains the custom pricing for the promotion: 10 cans nets you a hamburger or cheeseburger, while 40 will get you a Big Mac. The billboards are mostly centered around parks or summer festival areas, where, as DDB Stockholm puts it, “you’ll find a lot of young people with empty drink cans and empty wallets.”

McDs

The campaign makes a lot of sense for McDonald’s, since it not only aligns the often criticized brand with a cause, but also gets a younger crowd inside the store—an age group which the brand has struggled to appeal to (at least stateside). And once in the store, many customers could opt for fries or a drink to go with the burger, increasing sales of such items.  See full article here.

Why It’s Hot

  • Cause marketing- trying to entice consumers to recycle/go green
  • In a time where people are more and more health conscious, McDonald’s found an angle where they can get a younger crowd to come in and spend a little money, while still “doing good”

In Turkey, Reuse a Bottle to Save a Dog

Recycling feels good, but feeding a hungry dog while doing it probably feels even better.

A Turkish company called Pugedon recently introduced in Istanbul a vending machine that provides food and water to stray dogs. Istanbul-ites pour into the machine any water left in a soon-to-be-discarded bottle, then insert the bottle into the machine, and food and water pour out of a low opening for dogs to come enjoy.

The Smart Recycling Boxes cost the city no money, as the recycled bottles cover the cost of the food. You bet that when I visit Istanbul, I’ll recycle all of my bottles. And play with the dogs – after they eat, of course.

Via Huffington Post

Why It’s Hot: These innovative vending machines were built to help the estimated 150,000 stray cats and dogs in Istanbul, but this situation is universal. As we remember from the 2014 Winter Olympics, Sochi, Russia also has a sizable stray dog population. Cities around the world can adopt this idea to build their own machines, clean streets of old bottles while helping to feed malnourished stray animals.

Coca-Cola 2nd Lives

Coca-Cola invents 16 crazy caps to turn empty bottles into useful objects. Thanks to this new “2nd Lives” kit from the brand, you can now transform your Coke into something even more delightful.

Created with the help of Ogilvy & Mather China, the campaign features a line of 16 innovative caps that can be screwed on to bottles when they’re empty, transforming them into useful objects like water guns, whistles, paint brushes, bubble makers and pencil sharpeners.

Why it’s hot: a clever way to encourage recycling!