Hey can that robot make me live forever?

Robots, nanobots, human-looking robots…the race is on. It’s not a race to market. It’s actually a race to immortality. The Japanese pioneered the robot development as early as 2005…with RI-MAN: 

But the evolution has gone much further and, like so many things, is accelerating.

As the author, Peter Nichol says on CIO.com: Medical nanotechnology is expected to employ nanorobots that will be injected into the patient to perform work at a cellular level. Ingestibles and internables bring forward the introduction of broadband-enabled digital tools that are eaten and “smart” pills that use wireless technology to help monitor internal reactions to medications.

Robotics for healthcare are classified in three main categories of use:

  1. Direct patient care robots: surgical robots (used for performing clinical procedures), exoskeletons (for bionic extensions of self like the Ekso suit), and prosthetics (replacing lost limbs).  Over 500 people a day loses a limb in America with 2 million Americans living with limb loss according to the CDC.
  2. Indirect patient care robots: pharmacy robots (streamlining automation, autonomous robots for inventory control reducing labor costs), delivery robots (providing medical goods throughout a hospital autonomously), and disinfection robots (interacting with people with known infectious diseases such as healthcare-associated infections or HAIs).
  3. Home healthcare robots: robotic telepresence solutions (addressing the aging population with robotic assistance).

Why is this hot?

  • Robotics, pioneered by the Japanese as early as 2005 (RI-MAN above) is fast moving to nurses with human features and AI ability to do Q&A. They are already in research and university hospitals.
  • While the 3 categories are a general framework, the nanobot itself crawling through your bloodstream, checking for cancer cells, knitting your arteries, oxygenating our blood, preventing them from hardening and causing heart disease.
  • For those of you under 30 who think your immortal, you may have a chance.

I leave you with a forward-looking TED TALK on this topic from January, 2017:

 

Customer Service = $$$

According to a study from eMarketer and the CMO Council, there are a wide range of metrics being used by marketers to measure customer engagement.

If you or your brand or company just runs to “Did I make a sale?” bottom line, that is too one-dimensional an approach in a time when marketing is like a game of playing poker with a blindfold on.

Let me start with their conclusion: customer service is the key. Before we just nod and say yes, let’s all understand that this is a heavily nuanced strategy. Customer service is an end-to-end commitment — it runs on a platform of Customer-Centricity, insight, content and analytics that all line up to a great (and competitively differentiating) Customer Experience. Customer service is at the heart of Customer Experience Marketing (CXM).

  • Here’s my bottom line: 81% of customers just want their questions answered yet for companies they rank that as only valuable 10% as a valuable metric for customer engagement. 
  • For Biopharma, the lack of true customer service at the point of treatment initiation could help explain why nearly 25% of all Rx do not get filled or used.  Why doesn’t Biopharma use AI Bots like AlMe from NextIT? Or Sgt Star, from the U.S. Army? Intercept the patient at the point of doubt, don’t just assume the doctor convinced them of anything besides going to the pharmacy.

Or if you are a hospital network being rated on Outcomes and satisfaction scores, which hit the bottom line of reimbursement and positive word-of-mouth, Customer Service begins at check-in and continues post-release.

To some this may all seem like the blinding glimpse of the obvious, but how many Biopharma companies or hospitals really embrace this strategy? CXM is an enterprise-wide strategy hospitals and Biopharma need to adopt with C-level sponsorship, instead of building bad electronic Health Records or one-off patient apps.

Why is this hot? First because it shows a disconnect between customer expectations and what companies value as important measures. To bridge the gap, in a Customer-centric organization, you tie the dollars-made metric to customer engagement and satisfaction. So you need to measure both. In today’s marketing complexity, the formula is straight-forward:

Customer Service = $$$

Thanks to eMarketer and CMO Council for the data!

Let Doctors be Doctors! So says Rapper Dr. Zubin (With Over 1 million views!)

HSA 11.6. Dr Zubin photo

This post is about the Affordable Care Act. Or maybe it is about one doctor, Doctor Zubin. Like all major legislation, the ACA is complex and has it’s detractors and advocates. In some cases, one person can be both. Case in point: nearly all healthcare professionals agree that it is great that eventually the entire healthcare system will be tied together electronically — which will help lower costs, create healthier more empowered patients and allow doctors and others to coordinate patient care at a level no one could ever imagine.

That at least is the theory. The reality is that Electronic Health Records — the first step in Connected Health (my post of last week) — are a debacle. Hospitals and doctors offices keep installing and then throwing them out. One major criticism is the User Experience — but that goes beyond the interface. UX in this case is that doctors are trained to observe and engage with a patient, not look away and peck on a laptop keyboard. In other words, EHR’s are getting in the way of doctors being doctors.

HS EHR Use 11.6.15One doctor — Dr Zubin — is sick of it. What has he done? Gone on YouTube and taken on the broken healthcare system in musical rap videos and is trying to ignite a cause campaign to change healthcare. He has over a million views. As he states on his YouTube channel about his most recent video:  “EHR’s suck. Let’s make ’em better. Go to http://LetDoctorsBeDoctors.com and tell the IT and government folks what’s up. And check out http://zdoggmd.com for lyrics, behind-the-scenes dopeness, and all our other videos. Please SHARE…or the machines win.”

Why is this hot? First, it is radical that a doctor would create such a cause and bring it to life so creatively and publicly. Second, his use of social media, YouTube, multi-channel integration, is brilliant. Last, kudos for his boldness. He is taking on his entire industry and profession and broken many unspoken rules in his profession — decorum, keeping opinions private, even going against his own hospital employer! But I think his own video on October 19th on EHR’s speaks for itself:

 

When Coping with Mental Illness Turns into Awareness Driving Artwork + Gratitude

When coping with his own anxiety, UK-based illustrator, Toby Allen, found that drawing his worries and fears as little monsters would help him think about them differently and make his anxiety feel more manageable. Allen imagined that his anxiety could be overcome by giving it a physical from, giving it a visible weakness that he could learn to exploit.

From his creatively ideated coping mechanism, Real Monsters was born, creating a series of drawings that aim to raise mental health awareness – by depicting different disorders and conditions as monsters.

Toby Allen, Real Monsters Series

DepressionAllen’s Real Monsters series is a collection of 16 illustrations (with another eight in the pipeline) that tackle everything from depression and anxiety to schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder.

PTSD Anxiety

After receiving a positive response on his Tumblr-shared illustrations, Allen decided to tackle a variety of other conditions as part of a larger project. “I also wanted to try and educate people about mental illness and maybe even reduce the stigma surrounding it, through helping viewers to understand what it’s like to have one of these conditions,” he explained.

“I begin each monster design by researching the condition or disorder extensively, often relying on real life case studies or first person stories to get a better understanding of the illness I intend to draw,” continued Allen. “Of course each person’s experience with a mental illness will differ, so I try to create something that many people will find familiar.”

Allen said he regularly receives emails from people who thank him for creating the work.

“I have received so many wonderful messages from people who live with one or many of the disorders I have drawn, each telling me how much the work means to them and how it has helped them to think about their condition in a different or more positive way,” he said. “Of course, due to the sensitive subject matter, I have also received some negative feedback but that’s to be expected and I respect people’s opinions on the work.”

lightWhy It’s HOT: The destigmatization of mental illness has reached a much deserved tipping point, in which, discussing mental health has overcome countless cultural, gender, and age barriers due largely in part to raising awareness through social media. Today the sharing of one’s mental health condition often feels philanthropic in nature giving the person sharing and their journey through coping and living through managing their own challenges great meaning when used to help others.

Toby Allen’s Real Monsters series exemplifies the power of social to share one’s personal coping mechanism to help others while letting others know that are not alone.

You can see more of Real Monsters, as well as examples of Allen’s other work, on his Tumblr account: zestydoesthings.tumblr.com.

 

Source: Mashable

Do you “trust” Big Pharma? Do you care? Innovation.org bought to you by PhRMA lobbying group

Reputation plays a big role in many industries. For Big Pharma, each year brings a new corporate reputation survey that places the industry one notch above car salesmen and insurance companies. While there are many reasons for this – from the regulatory handcuffs of the FDA, to DTC-ads with their scary voice-overs, or frustration over drugs being too expensive to afford — there is a clear need to try and let the industry tell its story.

Thus, www.innovation.org. Here is the home of the industries “story.” HS Innovation.org h.page 8.27There is a ton of information, interactivity, mobile-friendly content. Just one of the top three tiles is an interactive guide to understanding clinical trials — one of the industries biggest issues due to poor patient recruitment and that they take so long and cost so much; next to that, articles and slideshow carousels on innovation and the future. Just from the home page, you can educate yourself with content that has never before been aggregated and delivered in such a consumer-friendly User Experience.

HS Innovation.org top 3 tiles

HS Clinical Eco-system 8.27

Why is this hot? Biopharma/Life Sciences is an enormous and incredibly complex and little understood industry. This content-rich Web site may seem like the industry is pulling back the curtain: but is it believable? At the very least, if you want to get an education on many aspects of the industry, this would be the place to do it.

This new site, www.innovation.org was created by the industry lobbying trade group, PhRMA. While their key audience may be politicians, policy-makers and such, this site was clearly created for patients and those in the public who relish information and any potential transparency that comes with it.

Oddly enough, while reputation can have a direct correlation to trusting a company’s product, it has little meaning or impact in Biopharma/Life Sciences. Most patients have no idea what company makes a drug; and most doctors, while aware, are driven by other more quantitative factors like clinical data.

So we have to ask the right questions: While it is very engaging and easy-to-navigate does it actually help the industry reputation? Or is it a self-serving content strategy served up with good UX? Or more realistically, will patients appreciate the content but cherry-pick what they believe, or not — this is an established behavior when searching for drug information…cull from a dozen sources, weigh the results and synthesize an opinion.

Perhaps the real strategy here was not to enhance reputation or gain consumer trust, but to just add one more source/voice to the conversation. In this world of too much information, they have decided that to join the discussion with credible, easy-to-understand content, thus they gain a share-of-Influence, while still striving to raise their credibility.

Building a Better Doctor’s Visit Through Telemedicine

Arizona Palliative Home Care started a new program within the Hospital “Hospice of the Valley.” The program takes care of seriously ill patients to improve their quality of life. Going in and out of the hospital for these patients are both difficult and expensive..

Because of this, Arizona Palliative has utilized technology from Avizia, a telemedicine company with a video chat system for easy communication with doctors and patients. A lot of these patients have cancer or dementia, and they’re using the technology to talk to patients about next steps for treatment – whether they want to undergo chemo if it means living for four more months. The platform also includes organizational software. The software, called Workflow, is a virtual waiting room. A doctor on call gets a private text by the Workflow operator, and if the doctor doesn’t respond in five minutes, the patient goes to the next doctor on call.

 

Avizia

Before the company used the video chat feature, doctors would be able to see 3-4 patients a day, now they are seeing 6-8 patients, doubling their rate.

Why it’s hot: We’ve seen video chatting already on the Walgreen App as well as Google chat, but a cart such as this could standardize talking with a doctor 24/7 around the world. People who are actually sick dread going to the doctor’s office. This could be seen as a solution to get people in and out quicker without even having to leave the house. Technology is ever-changing, and we’ve been seeing the trend of on-demand is taking over. Will we see the trend next at maybe the DMV?

 

Read more here: here