Your subway stop are now announced by…a brand?

On the 7 train into work this morning, I was greeted by the voice over the intercom, which I assumed was the train conductor, announced the next stop. Then, to my surprise the voice added “this is a local train so we are making all the stops, baby!!!” I thought an conductor was having fun. I was delighted.

Before long, it became clear that the voice was a recording of Awkwafina as part of an advertising campaign for Nora from Queens–a new television show. 

Awkwafina attends the IFP's 29th Annual Gotham Independent Film Awards at Cipriani Wall Street on December 02, 2019 in New York City.

Like me, some of the approximately 820,000 daily 7-train riders thought a live conductor was cracking jokes.

Other people recognized a new form of advertising and were annoyed.

For it’s part the MTA is interested in opening up more announcements to sponsors.

“We are exploring new and different ways to generate much needed revenue, while also surprising and delighting customers,” said NYC Transit chief customer officer Sarah Meyer.

Why it’s hot: 

As the era of voice technology arises, expectations about what spaces should be free from audio ads may shift. Is this a new opportunity, a new form of sound pollution, or both?

Making Plastic Priceless

Supreme has always excelled at being a coveted clothing brand for the cool kids, but this week they proved they had the cache to make even a piece of plastic an exclusive collectors item by placing their logo on a limited number of New York City Metro Cards to be distributed at random. No stranger to creating long lines (as can often be seen outside their Soho location) waves of expensive hoodie wearers are flooding Subway stations at Broadway-Lafayette Street, 125th Street, Queens Plaza, Marcy Ave, Atlantic Ave, Prince Street, Spring Street, and Union Square in hopes of getting their hands on this golden ticket. While the $5.50 two-way ride card retailing at the store’s flagship (good luck getting in) are already sold out those lucky enough to get their hands on the elusive collectors item quickly began reselling them on site’s like eBay for upwards of $1000. If paying $1000 for a piece of plastic isn’t a study in brand loyalty, I don’t know what is.

https://twitter.com/ComplexStyle/status/833834131079446529

Why It’s Hot

  • Creating this kind of newsworthy mayhem should be cause to take notice. What has the brand done that is has become so powerful as to make anything with their logo on it so valuable?
  •  Knowing your audience is key to any successful campaign. As a NYC based brand, this collaboration re-enforces the brand roots and enhances authenticity
  • Though profiting little from this endeavor, these types of marketing exercises serve to continue to build brand worth and recognition among their already loyal fan base and perhaps bring new audiences into the fray

Read more: The MTA’s Supreme-branded MetroCard is a hot commodity, The Supreme-Branded Metrocard Is HereSupreme Starts Frenzy at New York Subway StationsSupreme Is Coming Out With A Customized MetroCard, etc.

Uber Reached Deal With New York on Surge Pricing Emergencies

Uber reached an agreement with NY attorney general that would limit the cost an Uber driver can charge during emergencies.

Uber currently runs on a surge pricing model; the cost of rides increases during periods of high demand.The new agreement that was recently reached caps how high fare can reach during times of “abnormal disruptions of the market”– refering to citywide emergencies.

“Uber said the agreement was part of the company’s new nationwide policy of limiting surge pricing during emergencies. Fares may still rise higher than usual during an emergency, Uber said, but the increase will be restricted. Uber also said it planned to donate 20 percent of elevated fares charged during emergencies to the American Red Cross.” (Isaac)

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/08/uber-reaches-agreement-with-n-y-on-surge-pricing-during-emergencies/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

uber

Why It’s Hot:

Uber is a hot app that has been grabbing the attention of many. Uber was publicly critisized during Huricane Sandy when it applied surge pricing to many customers. Mr. Schneiderman wrote, “The abilitiy to pay truly exorbitant prices shouldn’t determine someone’s ability to get critical goods and services when theyre in short supply in an emergency.”