tour the dali museum, with your host…DALI!

When Salvador Dali once said, “If someday I may die…I hope the people…will say, ‘Dali has died, but not entirely”, I’m not sure he knew how right he was. Using AI, his namesake museum in St. Petersburg, Florida has now “resurrected” Dali to welcome visitors, and provide commentary on his works as you move throughout the institution.

According to the museum, they did it by “pulling content from millions of frames of interviews with the artist and overlaying it onto an actor’s face–a digital mask, of sorts, that allowed the actor to appear as Dali whatever expression he made.” It also “cast another actor from Barcelona to ensure that the voice matched the countenance.”

Why it’s hot:

There’s no better experience if you want to learn about an individual and his/her art than to hear about it directly from that person. Especially when they’re as dynamic and memorable as Salvador Dali. Unfortunately, most individuals famous enough to have their own museum likely aren’t on hand to do that in person. Having a virtual Dali guide you through his works seems a perfect way to experience his brilliance as both an artist, and a human being.

[Source]

Bringing Stolen Art Pieces Back to Their Frames

Cuseum, a company focussed on implementing augmented reality to improve museum experiences, is working with the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. In March 1990, thieves broke into the museum and stole 13 pieces of art worth an estimated $500 million. Today, the works have still not been recovered.

This year, on the 28th anniversary of the heist, Cuseum decided to use augmented reality powered by Apple’s ARKit to digitally put the stolen paintings back into their frames. Visitors are now able to see the pieces exactly where they originally were in the museum.

The museum is also offering a $10 million reward for any information that aids in the return of the stolen works.

Why it’s hot: This is a simple way to combine digtial and traditional ways to experience a museum, and leveraging AR to (somewhat) bring these paintings “home”.

Source: PSFK

Recommended: “A Piece of Work”

Here’s a shameless plug for a podcast I really dig: Abbi Jacobsen’s new “A Piece of Work” podcast, a collab with WNYC and MoMA.

Read more here: http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/a-piece-of-work-inside-abbi-jacobsons-new-art-podcast-w494252

And listen to it here: https://project.wnyc.org/new-piece-of-work-moma-podcast/?gclid=CjwKEAjwoNrMBRD4-viTlaj42GcSJAD84Ni_ahV6_Nn_s1DD-4Ghu_OA8CVfaSjqxUpt4qPH1CZ5sxoCB-Tw_wcB

WHY IT’S HOT:

I appreciate A Piece of Work for the way it demystifies what fine art is all about. It’s incredibly accessible– even the curators she interviews are surprisingly unpretentious– which is so refreshing. Plus, her guests are great–  there is nothing not funny about Hannibal Burress talking about Duchamp’s urinal found art sculpture. As an Art History nerd I love it, but I recommend it because living in New York City it is easy to forget the incredible art all around us and A Piece of Work is not only a great podcast but a great reminder.

Gravity Can’t Bring Love Down

UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive—or BAMPFA—wanted to give their new exhibition titled “Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia” a little bump.

But Goodby Silverstein & Partners, their agency, does not know how to give “bumps”. Instead, they shot this out of a bloody cannon by developing a geolocation-based augmented-reality mobile app that lets people pepper the virtual space over the Bay Area with digital balloon hearts containing hippy-like messages such as, “Love Is in the Air” or “Free sex”. Okay, okay, to be transparent, I TRIED to upload this last message but the app wouldn’t let me. Apparently, you have to be in the Bay Area. Bummer.

 

Anyway, think of it as a Pokémon, except instead of catching the little trolls, you are making and popping virtual hearts that release lovey-dovey messages.

In addition to allowing you to spread the virtual love, the app also plays ’60s and ’70s songs like John Lennon’s “Imagine” and features a virtual tour of Bay Area locations significant to the hippie movement’s artistic and political history.

Why It’s Hot:

  • NAILS a very unique and cool use of AR
  • Provides a gamified AR experience ala Pokémon
  • App is fun and practical – i.e. virtual tours tied to the thematic of the exhibition
  • Subtly hints at a larger cultural sentiment of acceptance and hippy rebellion