Coffee Delivery Drones Could Be Coming to Offices Soon

IBM has dreamed up the ultimate boost to employee productivity: drones that deliver coffee to people’s desks. They’ve filed a patent for technology that can identify the “cognitive state” of office workers to detect when a cup of coffee is needed.

IBM patent coffee delivery drone

The patent describes how the drones may be able to detect blood pressure, pupil dilation, and facial expressions that indicate a person is drowsy. The technology will also store individual preferences like what type of coffee they enjoy or whether or not they take sugar.

There are multiple ways in which coffee delivery can work: one option is to have coffee poured directly into a person’s mug, while another delivers coffee in a sealed bag. People can also summon coffee with a hand gesture.

Why It’s Hot

While it’s unclear whether IBM will actually build this coffee delivery system and how soon it could come to life, the technology has the potential to completely overhaul the office coffee break.

Source: Popular Mechanics

 

IBM Watson’s New Job as Art Museum Guide

For the launch of IBM Watson in Brazil, Ogilvy Brazil created an interactive guide that lets people have conversations with work housed at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo Museum. “The Voice of Art” replaces pre-recorded audio guides with a Watson-powered program that gleans data from books, old newspapers, recent articles, biographies, interviews and the internet.

It took IBM six months to teach Watson how to make sense of all that content. Hosted on cloud platform IBM Bluemix, its AI capabilities were put to work answering spontaneous questions about art by renowned Brazilian creators like Cândido Portinari, Tarsila do Amaral and José Ferraz de Almeida Júnior.

Conversational scope can range from historical and technical facts (like “What technique was used to create this painting?”) to the piece’s relation to contemporary events.

The video below does a nice job of showing how Watson fields natural questions whose answers feel especially relevant to the person asking, creating a unique connection between viewer and piece. In one cool moment, a boy approaches Portinari’s O Mestiço, a 1934 painting of a shirtless mixed-race man against the backdrop of a coffee farm.

When Oglivy found out 72 percent of Brazilians had never been to a museum, they saw an opportunity to make use of Watson’s cognitive intelligence to make their visit very interactive. At the museum’s entrance, visitors receive headphones and a smartphone equipped with the mobile app. As they walk, the app tells them when they’re approaching an art piece they can ask questions about. A separate feature, for hearing-impaired visitors, lets them interact through a built-in written chat tool.

Source: AdWeek

Why it’s hot:

  • This could have a lot of implications for our brands in the future – IBM Watson acting as a tour guide or concierge in different environments could help bridge knowledge gaps for things that need extra explaining, or for consumers that prefer more hands-on experiences.

Better Brews Come Delivered By Data Analytics

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Using sophisticated data science, IBM and Havas helia created a beer that tastes of joy and optimism. How you may ask? They used a tool called Watson Personality Insights, which analyzes language to produce a personality profile. The technology uses linguistic analysis to find meaning words. In linguistics, semantic analysis is the process of taking syntactic structures and relating them to each other.

First, the team observed the sentiment and the emotions found in the social media shared on and around New Year’s eve by running a data set of New Year’s related messages and shares on social media and matched them with a wide range of emotional states. The partners leveraged this powerful tool to extract cognitive and social characteristics from input text such as email, SMS, tweets, forum posts, and more. Through their analysis, the team found that the top most shared emotions were love, joy, harmony, cheerfulness, optimism, resolution and excitement.

With this profile the team worked together to capture the mood of the nation during the New Year party season to create the world’s first beer crafted and based on human emotions.

It then takes that profile and can categorise each beer according to different human adjectives, such as “assertive,” “friendly” or “intelligent.” Then the IBM Watson team began to analyse 2,800 different beer recipes while giving the computer descriptions about the ingredients, recipes, tasting notes and beer reviews. This method helped to identify the perfect recipe.

The top 10 beers that matched the most shared New Year emotions found in the data were then identified and, through further analysis, all of these beer recipes were combined to find the most common ingredients.

Honey, the Nelson Sauvin hop variety and the Hallertauer hop emerged as the top three most common ingredients among the beers.

  • Honey denotes love and cheerfulness
  • Nelson Sauvin is for optimism, imagination and resolution
  • Hallertauer is for excitement and emotion

Each of these ingredients was used to create flagship data-powered New Year beer: 0101. For the complicated project—the team picked High Peak Brew Co, an independent microbrewery based in the UK’s Peak District, to head up the brewing project. They tapped this particular brewery because the company’s brews are unfined and unfiltered, like the content of the social activity they tested. They worked with them to get an exact taste that would match the data as closely as possible.

Helia works with data to uncover patterns in human behavior, mixing that with cultural understanding to inspire more creative ideas. Why does this matter? The service helps users to understand, connect to, and communicate with other people on a more personalized level. With this powerful tool we can derive consumers’ cognitive and social preferences just with the language they use. The service applies linguistic analytics and personality theory to infer attributes from a person’s unstructured text.

Source: PSFK

Why It’s Hot

It’s a data-driven world. But it’s an emotional, unpredictable word too. I appreciate the effort to bring the two together with this experiment. And of course, there’s the beer aspect.

Through tools like this we can gain insight into how and why people think, act, and feel the way they do. This means companies and coders can use data and technology to interpret something abstract such as positive feelings and emotions and turn them into an experience to build upon.

 

 

IBM Media Campaign – Creative Overview

An IBM cloud media campaign on MIT Technology Review caught my attention today. The compelling creative, eye-catching formats mixed with more subdued ones, common theme with intelligent looking faces and matching landing pages – all converged into a campaign that made me pay attention. Great execution, IBM!

Banner Executions. Each one leads to unique landing pages where benefits are explained. Look and feel is extended from banner to landing page. Example of one landing page is below the banners.

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Landing Page Example:
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Why It’s Hot: memorable execution and exceptional follow-through with banner campaign.

A Computer Can Critique Your Writing

The difference between humans and machines is that humans have feelings, they can “read” other people, they understand social cues (for the most part). These are such viscerally, exclusively human experiences – but maybe not for much longer. The IBM Watson Tone Analyzer can do what we thought only humans could do: analyze a text and judge the tone.

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Building on similar linguistic analyses that power IBM Watson Personality Insights, Tone Analyzer analyzes given text and provides insights about the emotional, social and writing tones reflected in that text. It is only available in experimental mode as of now, but it essentially works as a sort of Google Translator for emotions. You copy and paste a body of text and the Analyzer will x-ray and evaluate the words using three “dimensions” outlined below:

Emotional Tone: Many psychology models exist in literature to capture human emotions such as anger, fear, anticipation, surprise, joy, sadness, trust, and disgust. We have developed a model for inferring emotions from written text. Tone Analyzer captures the salient three among these that we found to be relevant for Tone analysis based on our user studies. These include: cheerfulness, negative emotions and anger. Cheerfulness refers to positive emotions such as joy, optimism, contentment, inspiration, and happiness. Negative emotions include feelings of fear, disgust, despair, guilt, rejection, and humiliation. Anger is a type of negative feeling with strong intensity such as annoyance, hostility, aggression, hurt, frustration and rage.

Social Tone: Social tone includes aspects of social propensities in people’s personality. Tone Analyzer currently uses three social tones namely: openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness adopted from the Big-five personality model. Specifically, openness is the extent to which a person is open to experience a variety of activities; agreeableness is a tendency to be compassionate and cooperative towards others; and conscientiousness is a tendency to act in an organized or thoughtful way. We use these three dimensions to illustrate the openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness of the writer as reflected in the text.

Writing Style/Tone: Writing tone provides feedback on how analytical, confident and tentative one’s writing is. Analytical tone shows a person’s reasoning and analytical attitude about things. Confidence tone indicates the degree of certainty exhibited by an individual towards something. Tentative tone shows the attitude of inhibition.

Source

Why it’s Hot:

This is the kind of technology I could only imagine existing in sci-fi movies, and I always feel like society is just advancing toward an era not unlike that of The Matrix (Why else would iPhones be getting incrementally larger with each new version? It’s because one day they will be human-sized, and suddenly you aren’t using your iPhone, your iPhone is using you).

My paranoia aside, the Analyzer can be used for things like market research and business communications. And not only does it analyze the tone of your writing, it gives you suggestions on how to improve it.

Yes. A computer can to tell you, a human, how to improve your writing.

As an experiment, I tested out the IBM Watson Tone Analyzer on my “Why It’s Hot” paragraph:

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Here is the link if you want to try it yourself.

 

Making Music with Tennis Data

IBM and the U.S. Open teamed up together for last year’s summer tournament to bring an interesting twist to what is often thought of as an older sport. IBM’s data team partnered with James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem fame to translate the raw data that IBM collects during matches into listenable music. The raw data that is collected passes through an algorithm that James and his collaborators created that eventually spits out something that is pleasing to the ear. Some tweaks are then made by James and tracks are created.

Why It’s Hot:

We often hear the buzzword of Big Data being thrown around constantly but have many different ways of interpreting its definition. Some may say it’s for optimizing experiences, uncovering insights, or seeing patterns that we normally would not have been able to uncover. In this case, the data is actually used as a medium to create art with. There are tons of ways to think about and use data, this just happens to be one of the more creative and sonically appealing.