Facial recognition cash withdrawal

Residents in Tibet can now use the facial recognition technology to withdraw cash at ATMs from the Agricultural Bank of China, no debit cards needed.

Also powered by the facial recognition technology, the Agricultural Bank of China is testing card-less and device-less payments at a pilot supermarket in Chongqing, China. Shoppers can pay for items by looking into the camera in the supermarket after putting the item in shopping basket. Transactions will automatically be conducted for registered Agricultural Bank of China customers.

Why it’s hot: There might be a day that our face truly becomes our identify and is all we need to conduct transactions and other businesses in the future.

Source

90 terabytes of facial recognition

China facial recognition

China is building the world’s most powerful facial recognition system with the power to identify any one of its 1.3 billion citizens within three seconds. The government states the system is being developed for security and official uses such as tracking wanted suspects and public administration and that commercial application using information sourced from the database will not be allowed under current regulations.

“[But] a policy can change due to the development of the economy and increasing demand from society,” said Chen Jiansheng, an associate professor at the department of electrical engineering at Tsinghua University and a member of the ministry’s Committee of Standardisation overseeing technical developments in police forces.

Chinese companies are already taking the commercial application of facial recognition technology to new heights. Students can now enter their university halls, travellers can board planes without using a boarding pass and diners can pay for a meal at KFC. Some other restaurants have even offered discounts to customers based on a machine that ranks their looks according to an algorithm. Customers with “beautiful” characteristics – such as symmetrical features – get better scores than those with noses that are “too big” or “too small” and those that get better scores will get cheaper meals.

More at South China Morning Post and ABS-CBN.

Why It’s Hot
Another weekly installment of balancing convenience and claims of safety with privacy and ethics. China is pushing us faster than most other countries to address this question sooner rather than later.

your face is your ticket…


Jet Blue is now piloting airport technology that would replace your boarding pass with a scan of your face.

Here’s how it works:

“The process is fairly simple: Passengers step up to a camera to have their picture taken. The picture is then compared with passport photos in the CBP database and to verify flight details. If successful, the passenger is notified that they are cleared to board by an on-screen message at the camera terminal.”

Why it’s hot:

I’m not sure how smooth the experience sounds at the moment, but the idea of never needing to have a boarding pass either physically or on your phone, and just being able to walk on to your flight sounds pretty no non-sense  (except you still have to remember what seat you’re in). It makes you think – there are probably many such things that “outerweb” technology could replace that we currently do with our phones. What happens to our phones when biometrics and other technologies can enable us to do what we’re now doing with our smartphones?

 

better living partying through chemistry technology…


[about 2:05-2:45 should do it]

It’s not just a clever name, PartyBOT is your “Artificial Dance Assistant”, or ADA for short. Debuted at SxSW last month, ADA learns about party-goers musical tastes, drink preferences, and social savvy. Then, it uses facial and voice recognition to monitor the room, playing tunes tailored to the interests of those who aren’t partying hard enough as determined by their expressions and conversations. As described by its creators…

“The users’ relationship with the bot begins on a mobile application, where—through a facial recognition activity—the bot will learn to recognize the user and their emotions. Then, the bot will converse with the user about party staples—music, dancing, drinking and socializing—to learn about them and, most importantly, gauge their party potential. (Are they going to be a dance machine or a stick in the mud—the bot, as a bouncer of sorts, is here to find out.)

Upon arrival at the bar, the user will be recognized by PartyBOT, and throughout the party, the bot will work to ensure a personalized experience based on what it knows about them—their favorite music, beverages, and more. (For example, they might receive a notification when the DJ is playing one of their favorite songs.)”

Why it’s hot:

Obviously this was an intentionally lighthearted demonstration of using bot and other technology to improve an experience for people. Apart from knowing you like Bay Breezes, imagine the improved relationship brands could have with their customers by gathering initial preferences and using those to tailor experiences to each individual. Many times bots are thought of in very simplistic – question/answer/solution form – but this shows how combining AI with other emerging technologies can make for a much more personally exciting overall experience.

British Airways Is Using Facial Recognition To Make Boarding Faster

The U.K.’s largest airline, British Airways, is making the boarding process a little less tedious by using facial recognition technology at London’s Heathrow Airport.

A biometric device at the airport’s Terminal 5 scans passengers and boarding passes, then a second facial scan at the gate confirms their identity, without having to rustle around in search of any documents.

Three gates have incorporated the system, but the airline is soon planning to expand to 33 more according to Skift. So far it’s only being used in domestic flights.

This new development fits right in with most airports’ current trend of automation. Self-check-in kiosks are in many around the globe, including Heathrow, and new opportunities for technology to take a leading role in airport security are sure to keep on popping up.

Source: PSFK

Why It’s Hot:

This just makes a ton of sense as a way to use technology to make people’s lives easier, and potentially safer.

China’s High-Tech Tool to Fight Toilet Paper Bandits

The toilet paper thieves of the Temple of Heaven Park were an elusive bunch.

They looked like most park visitors, practicing tai chi, dancing in the courtyards and stopping to take in the scent of ancient cypress and juniper trees. But hidden in their oversize shopping bags and backpacks was a secret: sheet upon sheet of crumpled toilet paper, plucked surreptitiously from public restrooms.

Now the authorities in Beijing are fighting back, going so far as to install high-tech toilet paper dispensers equipped with facial recognition software in several restrooms.

Before entering restrooms in the park, visitors must now stare into a computer mounted on the wall for three seconds before a machine dispenses a sheet of toilet paper, precisely two feet in length. If visitors require more, they are out of luck. The machine will not dispense a second roll to the same person for nine minutes.

At the Temple of Heaven Park, one of Beijing’s busiest tourist sites, many people said on Monday they were pleased by the new machines.

“The people who steal toilet paper are greedy,” said He Zhiqiang, 19, a customer service worker from the northwestern region of Ningxia. “Toilet paper is a public resource. We need to prevent waste.”

Qin Gang, 63, taking a stroll through the park with his wife, said China’s history of crippling poverty had left some people eager to exploit public goods.

“It’s a very bad habit,” Mr. Qin said. “Maybe we can use technology to change how people think.”

Not everyone was enthusiastic. Some people, frustrated by the new technology, banged their fists against the machines, which park employees said cost about $720 each.

Other visitors had more exacting critiques.

“The sheets are too short,” said Wang Jianquan, 63, a retired shopping mall manager.

Lei Zhenshan, marketing director for Shoulian Zhineng, the company in Tianjin that designed the device, said in an interview: “We brainstormed many options: fingerprints, infrared and facial recognition. We went with facial recognition, because it’s the most hygienic way.’’

Mr. Lei said an earlier version of the device was installed last year at the Bird’s Nest stadium in Beijing. An official at the Temple of Heaven, who would not give her name, said the facial recognition dispensers there were on trial, and if judged a success, would be placed in all the park’s toilet

Source: New York Times

Why It’s Hot

Somethings technology can go too far. I like the idea of getting creative and using technology to solve low-tech problems, but this seems to have gone too far for what it’s worth.

Protecting Yourself in the Facial-Recognition Era

Facial-recognition might make tagging photos a lot easier on Facebook, but let’s face it: there’s a lot of unresolved implications for the long-term about this increasingly integrated technologies. Rather than putting themselves at risk, some people are choosing just to opt-out altogether.

How do you go dark when your data is collected without your knowledge or consent?

It’s not a catch-all, but start with protective eyewear. The Privacy Visor, first unveiled in 2012, are glasses that reflect light in a way that confuses facial-detection software. More specifically, the glasses disrupt the patterns of light and dark spots around the eyes and nose that allow computer algorithms to recognize that a face is even present in the frame. Although the glasses don’t guarantee complete privacy, project lead Isao Echizen says tests have shown it to work over 90% of the time.

3050252-inline-priavacy-visor

As camera technology has adapted to more closely mimic human sight, The Privacy Visor has been updated to better shield identities even as the scanning technology advances. Echizen is pushing forward with the concept’s commercialization, targeting mid-next year to begin production of more fashionable and effective versions.

Why It’s Hot

The Privacy Visor is a product that exists to treat the symptom of a much larger problem: maintaining control of one’s own identity. It might be good for those of us who are paranoid, and those of us who very legitimately want to maintain control of the information they create about themselves… online and out in the world. In fact some privacy advocates go as far as saying the Privacy Visor is a detriment to the cause because its very existence is in effect “giving in” to these huge pressures for amassing databases of personally identifiable information. So the bigger question becomes less about the specifics of this product, and more about the broader culture of acceptance we’re creating.

Via FastCompany

Augmented Mirror Lets You Test Drive Makeup

modiface-mirror

Modiface’s Mirror combines augmented reality and facial recognition so shoppers can see what they’ll look like with different shades of makeup before making a purchase decision.

The Mirror combines a 3D live-video feed with a Photoshop-style sampler of more than 2,000 existing products and that maps the shades and textures to a movable, rotatable image of the user’s face.

Mirror’s core format is a sales kiosk, a robust and stand-alone version that automatically grabs a browser’s image and attracts their attention with recommended shades and brands. Once interested, the shopper can experiment with various products until the shopper becomes a buyer.

The concept is also available as a less robust, but considerably less expensive, app that uses a smart phone’s camera to capture the image. The apps are available for iPhones, Android and most tablets.

Mirror also includes an anti-aging mirror that shows the long-term benefits of using various moisturizing and age-reversing products. The featurette shows these effects as a slow progression, demonstrating the gradual effects.

modiface

ModiFace began in 1999 with initial research into facial analysis at Stanford University. The work continued through 2006 when ModiFace, Inc was born. Modiface technology has gone on to hold the leading patent portfolio on skin and facial analysis, powering over 150 web and mobile apps with a total of over 50 million downloads as of March 2015.

Modiface-2

Source: PSFK

Why It’s Hot

I’ve been paying close attention to retail trends that (1) enable creative sampling in a digital world and (2) connect the digital & physical in useful ways that can encourage purchase. This technology is a great example of both of these trends, and could open the door for even more impactful usage — think pre-surgical previews, impacts of UV exposure and more.

Maintain Your Privacy by Wearing this New Accessory

With each new technology seems to come new concerns about privacy. New “privacy glasses” by software firm AVG seek to minimize worries over facial recognition on social media.

The glasses use infrared LEDs surrounding your eyes and nose to essentially “mess with” smartphone cameras when taking pictures. By distorting the light around one’s eyes and nose, it prevents facial recognition technology that is built into most social media platforms from identifying people.

Read more about the privacy glasses on Engadget.

Why It’s Hot | While the glasses are only in prototyping phase, and still just look like a novelty party accessory, it’s not surprising that companies are finding ways to prevent facial recognition technology. With each new innovation comes more worries about “big brother” watching over us, and these glasses are just a step in the direction of privacy over convenience. It’ll be interesting to watch which end of that struggle wins out over time.

Women’s Aid highlights domestic abuse with ‘world first’ interactive billboard

To coincide with International Women’s Day this Sunday, London agency WCRS teamed up with Women’s Aid and Ocean Outdoor to create some remarkable digital billboards about domestic violence. They use facial recognition to recognize when people are paying attention to the image of a bruised woman. As more people look at the ad, her bruises and cuts heal faster, communicating the benefit of not turning a blind eye to the problem. The ad contained a CTA allowing people to donate from their phone. Read more.

userjourney

 

Why It’s Hot:
This execution is a perfect blend of technology and creativity. Most brands use DOOH to only communicate messaging, but this demonstrates how even traditional types of media can be used to create an emotional connection and drive immediate action enabled by mobile.

Facebook New Facial Recognition to Have ‘Near-Human Accuracy’

Image

Facebook is developing software called DeepFace, which maps 3D facial features and creates a colorless model to narrow in on specific characterizations. Facebook looks at modern face recognition in four phases: detect, align, represent, classify. The technology may offer “near-human accuracy”–in fact, the software’s accuracy is reported to be 97.25%, which is nearly the same as the accuracy humans have at identifying faces (97.5% according to Facebook API Group).

Facebook looked at 4.4 million tagged faces from its user base to help develop the technology and enable the system to better identify facial features specific to each person.

Facebook is expected to present DeepFace at the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition in June, according to MIT Technology Review. Timetable for availability on Facebook is not clear at this point.

Facebook DeepFace

Sources: Mashable; Technoblog.com

Why It’s Hot

The software can compare 2 photos and, with essentially the same accuracy as a human, identify whether they are the same person–even if the photos aren’t tagged. Given that Facebook now has the largest photo library in the World, it now has the ability to match all the faces within it. Facebook has already been at the center of privacy concerns. This certainly can add to that debate.