Did you register?

Voting season is upon us. So first, did you register to vote yet?

It’s brought up in most conversations I’ve had recently, even at work. All over everywhere and with customers wanting brands to align with their beliefs or have more of a community mindset there has been some brands taking a stand and asking, imploring you to take a stand as well.

What these emails have: (And what I consider Do’s)

1.) A message that connects the brand to voting

  • As most of the emails I saw were mostly ecommerce and fashion brands, you have to remind your customer why this message is coming from you. (Jenna you said it best today) Everyone should want to be Nike as they really did it. (Pun Intended) “No more sitting on the sidelines. The 2020 election season is here, and we are playing for the future. It’s up to each and every one of us. Register to vote today.”

2.) Call to action to register

  • This is obvious but needed, it can’t be just a reminder to vote. Pairing the message with a next step, providing a pathway for the end user to uphold your rationale for interjecting in the conversation. Most emails have this, the question is where to place it if you have an offer included. Clare and Baggu Both had it after their offer but Nike because there was no offer had it in their email.

3.) A partnership with – “When We All Vote”

  • Adding credibility with an organization that is specialized in that.

4.) Merchandise that is linked to voting. 

  • Could be questionable. But I think most people want to commemorate the fact that they voted and also urge others to do so. Especially when paired with a give-back of some sort I think this authenticates the offer and the message. See Baggu, a handbag and accessory company gives 100% back to the sales from the collaboration of a SF Based artist to the Black Voters Matter Fund. And Clare giving a 10% from their When We All Vote collaboration back to the organization.

What some of these emails have that are questionable:

1.) A hashtag that connects the brand and voting. 

  • As I know most brands want to continue the conversation, and gauge impact on socials so a hashtag is a good way to see that. Voting on the other hand is both personal, communal and a heavier topic that when paired with a hashtag of a brand might cheapen the message to people that aren’t apart of the core ride or die audience for your brand. NYX Cosmetics has the #NYXCosmeticsVote.

2.) Pairing unrelated products with no give back.

  • Additionally, adding products that are unrelated with no giveback, or promoting “Friends&Family” sales that aren’t because of voting cheapens your message because these are two entirely separate actions. It comes of as disingenuous because of the incongruent of the message.

Why it’s hot:

A moment to think about in communications, it doesn’t come often but could potentially have an impact on your audience when you do it right.

Source: ReallyGoodEmails.com

MailChimp is broadening its horizons

Think MailChimp just supports small business email marketing? Think again.

Based in Atlanta–far outside Silicon Valley’s bubble of venture-funded would-be unicorns–the company has 600-plus employees and did more than $400 million in revenue last year. More than 15 million customers sent 246 billion emails in 2016.

But the future of the company, CEO Ben Chestnut says, is “to take MailChimp magic we give to email, and sprinkle it on other marketing channels.”

A year ago, MailChimp introduced a recommendation engine–akin to the ones devised by big companies such as Amazon–that let its customers plunk product suggestions into the emails they sent their customers. In January of this year, it began helping small businesses buy Facebook ads.

Now MailChimp’s Instagram ad-buying feature aims to simplify the process of purchasing ads.

MailChimp’s strategy with these new ad-buying services and other functionality it’s recently added isn’t to give itself a new revenue stream. Instead, it’s offering them as part of its existing subscriptions at the same price as before. As with its freemium model, the company is betting that the more essential it can make itself to the way small businesses operate, the easier it will be to get large numbers of them to pay on an ongoing basis.

https://www.fastcompany.com/40424782/mailchimp-wants-to-solve-every-small-biz-marketing-challenge-even-snail-mail

Why It’s Hot
While most companies aim to leave their roots behind and move on to bigger and better customers, MailChimp is staying firmly committed to small businesses and providing them easy yet robust marketing support at a price most can afford.

How Pretty Are Your Email Subject Lines? And What Media Can Learn From It.

What do “still time” and “prettiest” have in common for retailers? According to February 2015 research by Return Path, they’re the most effective keywords used in retail marketing email subject lines, with respective average read rates of 33.73% and 32.50%. “Cheapest” ranked third, while command words “download” and “register” rounded out the top five, all with read rates hovering around 25% on average.

Retail-Email-1

Return Path also looked at what not to do for retail email subject lines. “Get rid of” was the least-read, with an average rate under 5%. Despite the effectiveness of “offer,” other money-saving phrases “2-for-1” and “half off” didn’t fare as well. And while “expire” and “hurry” were relatively well-read, other urgency keywords “extended” and “running out” landed in the bottom 10.

It takes more than choosing the right words to drive readership; length matters too. The research found that retail marketing emails with between 61 and 70 characters had the highest average read rate, at 17%. Interestingly, the second-most-read emails jumped to subject lines with between 91 and 100 characters.

Retail-Email-2

Why It’s Hot: Testing email subject lines can help retailers figure out what to use, and not use, when sending a message out to the masses. Email marketing is one of the industries where most testing is done. Potentially such research can be applied to digital advertising like banners, native and paid social.