It’s Game Time: Tracking the 2019 Super Bowl Ads

Image result for super bowl mercedes benz atlantaIt’s the week before the Big Game and some advertisers have already started rolling out sneak peeks and in some cases, full ads.

Up first, Stella Artois released their full ad on Monday, which features two memorable characters coming together to pitch the Belgian pilsner.  The unlikely duo of Carrie Bradshaw and The Dude were brought together for the beer brand’s Change Up the Usual campaign.

Lil Jon is tempting the fates of losing his “Atlanta” card by partnering with Pepsi in a trailer for the Big Game, which takes a mocking tone towards Pepsi’s rival Coca-Cola and its Perfect Pour.  Standby for if Lil Jon will be invited back to his hometown after Sunday’s game in the ATL.

ASMR is a hot trend right now.  Pepsi is creating its interpretation using Cardi B and Michelob Ultra is leveraging Zoe Kravitz in its version of the kooky internet phenomenon.

Take a look at the rest of the ads and teasers here: Adweek

If you want to get in on live action, this year 3 Percent Conference is expanding on their Super Bowl Tweet Up, by rolling out locations in cities including Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco.  To find out more, go here: https://www.3percentmovement.com/tweetup

And if you want to vote for your favorites and not so favorites, you can visit USA Today’s Ad Meter to cast your vote! http://admeter.usatoday.com/ 

Why Its Hot:

Its the Super Bowl.  And at over $5M for a 30 second spot, this ad arena is not for the faint of heart, or the light in the wallet.  But overall trends here, will dictate the direction for brands and advertisers in 2019.  Agencies will need to quickly have POVs for the winners and the losers and how we can use those learnings to guide future creative requests.   Watch this space for a recap of the winners and the losers next week!

World’s first baby marathon

Babies can cover a distance of more than 3 kilometers per day, according to research by New York University. Taking this data, babycare brand Huggies decided to host a Baby Marathon to raise awareness of its products in South Africa.

Four babies, nicknamed Thunder Pants, Hurricane Thando, Racin’ Grays and Danger Boy, were tasked with roaming 21km around their homes. Their progress was recorded over seven days using custom-made fitness trackers.

Huggies covered the race in four online episodes. With a fake sports commentator narrating the action, the videos highlight the effectiveness of Huggies diapers as if they were sports gear. Viewers could find out more about the products, as well as the babies and their training regimes, on a dedicated microsite

The Baby Marathon resulted in a 28.9% increase in Huggies’ diaper sales. The campaign trended within 10 mins of launch for 9 hours and attracted 8.4 million views.

Why it’s hot?
Brings the sportswear performance psychology to baby products.
By showing babies as athletes, it breaks away from the usual diaper efficacy claims.

Source: Huggies, South Africa

Is Lebron James one of the Best Brand Storytellers of All Time?

As one of the greatest to ever play the game, and perhaps one of the most polarizing figures in sports today, Lebron James’s has seen his share of ups and downs since he joined the NBA in 2003. But there’s no arguing that James has carefully crafted his Brand. At times powerfully emotional – at times wholly contrived – James harnesses his branded partnerships and massive media leverage to tell his story and sell product while he’s at it. Because that’s exactly what a superstar player like James does off the court– he constructs and carefully manages his image. Through media and brand partnerships over the years, James has established himself as one of the most iconic figures in advertising– most notably through his work with Nike.

This week, The Ringer published a retrospective look at James’s Brand narrative, so to speak, “A Reverse Chronology of Lebron James’s Persona, Told Through His Commercials”

Here’s my favorite:

Why It’s Hot:

Watching James’s career through the lens of his ads shows us the story arc of his own personal brand strategy come to life. Juxtaposing James’s Nike spots during his stint in Miami with those that followed once he returned as the Prodigal Son of Cleveland make for an uneasy character study; The Ringer’s Jason Concepcion cynically muses of the spots, “Authenticity is a valuable commodity that can be replicated as necessary”. Yet if this tells us anything as marketers, it’s that strong brands are resilient, despite losses, missteps, and change.

Facebook Testing Branded Selfie Filters

The battle between Facebook and Snapchat continues…

The social giant, Facebook, recently announced that it is looking to open up a new revenue stream by improving its ad offering. The company will test brands sponsoring augmented reality selfie lenses in the style of Snapchat.

Hollywood Studios will be the first brand to gain access to this offering as an “unpaid experiment” to help promote big-budget releases and it’s expected to launch in March of 2017.

Why Its Hot: According to Snapchat, snaps with filters are viewed more than 1 billion times per day.  “Snapchat has proven that people will create content with brand filters and share it with their friends. In fact, this type of participatory marketing has forged a new category of advertising called “shared media,” which is beginning to explode even beyond the confines of the Snapchat community.” – AdWeek Guest

Facebook is looking to capitalize on the success that Snapchat has been receiving by experimenting with a similar offering. Currently, no other mainstream ad product has persuaded people to voluntarily brand themselves and then organically share content of their branded selves across their social networks

It will be interesting to see how Facebook’s audience reacts to the feature considering users on Snapchat have the option to view branded content. Whereas on Facebook, branded content will be served to users in Newsfeed, Knowing this, how will Facebook try to combat branded content becoming invasive considering that is the beauty of Snapchat right now?

Learn More: http://www.thedrum.com/news/2017/01/31/facebook-apparently-testing-snapchat-style-branded-selfie-filters-hollywood-studios

Gatorade Puts Audiences Behind the Plate as Bryce Harper

Leveraging Google’s YouTube 360 platform for creating immersive brand experiences, Gatorade is giving users a chance to step up to bat and get in the mind/body of MLB Nationals star Bryce Harper.

 

Audiences who watch the branded experience are dropped into the world of Harper as a virtual reality imagination of what it’s like to go to bat in a baseball game. The inner monologue, the lights, the warping of time, and of course sponsorships. The Gatorade team used a 14-camera rig to create the real-time video/CGI engagement.

Why It’s Hot

Gatorade demonstrates the power that engaging content marketing can have. Brands can embed themselves into meaningful, powerful experiences… not just float around the periphery as an advertiser that gets in the way of a person’s interest. Gatorade succeeds because they created something visceral that grips viewers, surrounding them with subtle brand experience that suggests what it might be like to use, experience or benefit from the product… without ever directly saying it.

Via AdAge

Netflix goes Native with “TV Got Better”

Unlike the advertorials of yesterday, Netflix’ sponsored content feature on Wired.com deserves to be editorial; is the type of content that you would think Wired would be proud to publish. In “TV Got Better”, Netflix explores how digitization changed the entertainment industry; allowing for greater creativity and risk-taking, giving rise to unique programming like “orange is the new black” and “house of cards”, and genres, that wouldn’t find a home in yesterday’s prime-time line-up of silly sitcoms.

genre

Far more than a flat editorial, this content piece includes an interview with the creator of Arrested Development, an infographic that updates in real-time with Twitter conversation data (above) and an interactive timeline, showcasing milestones in TV history. Not only is the interactive, smart content right at home with Wired, but the tone and vocabulary are carefully crafted for this audience, with words ranging from “scatological” (I had to look it up) to “cringier” (they made it up), and lots of esoteric references that readers would be proud to “get”. It even teases the audience a bit for taking itself so seriously, “We continue to torment ourselves with the idea that it is merely entertainment, something beneath our dignity”, while using “we” (vs. “you”) to imply that Netflix and the Wired audience are “one”.

While Netflix does mention its own name at the very end of the piece, it seems unnecessary, since Netflix and/or a few other digital video producers/distributors are likely at the forefront of every readers’ mind by this point, which is the goal!

Why it’s Hot: With “branded interactive content” named one of 3 marketing trends that is about to change the industry, marketers and agencies are going to be seeking great examples to learn from and emulate. Netflix “TV Got Better” is at the top of my list!