Yeehaw! You can now draw objects for 3D printing

The Yeehaw Wand simplifies the design process for 3D printable objects by allowing anyone to create an object with a smartphone or tablet. The kit comes with a wand to draw with and plate that displays the object with a 360-degree view. The plate connects to the owner’s device where the virtual object appears.

The device shows objects on the user’s view of the real world, where they can be manipulated—for example, you can have a person model for a 3D printed necklace. The software was intended to feel open-ended for anyone to pick up the wand and sketch whatever comes to mind.

A finished design can transfer over to any 3D printer. If someone purchases the Yeehaw Wand without access to one, they can send their design to the kits’s developers who print and ship the finished product.

The Yeehaw Wand is raising funds in a Kickstarter campaign that concludes on January 14.

Why it’s hot: While the ‘pen’ or ‘wand’ does not look very intuitive or easy to use, this is an example of 3D printing and augmented reality becoming that much more accessible.

Source: PSFK

 

create connected 3D printed objects…


3D printers helped us make a great leap into autonomous making with the ability to create our own physical “products”. But in a world where increasingly physical objects and products are connected, it’s frustrating not to be able to create 3D things that can be connected to digital devices. Enter researchers from University of Washington, who have “developed a way to 3D print plastic objects and sensors capable of communicating wirelessly with other smart devices, without the need for batteries or other electronics”.

As they say:

“The key idea behind our design is to communicate by reflections. The way that we do this is by reflecting Wi-Fi signals in the environment, similar to how you can use a mirror to reflect light. We 3D print antennas and switches that allow us to reflect radio signals. Using these components, we can build sensors that can detect mechanical motion, like water flow sensors and wind speed sensors. These sensors can then translate mechanical motion into reflections of Wi-Fi signals. As a result, we can create printable objects that can communicate wirelessly with Wi-Fi- enabled devices.”

Why It’s Hot:
It’s a primitive solution, but at least it’s an attempt to start enabling us to create our own “smart” products. In a world where soon almost all products will be connected, this is a promising step towards a true maker economy.

[Source]