Kosher Bacon?

Rabbi Gavriel Price  is in charge of figuring out how the Orthodox Union, the largest kosher certifying organization in the world, should deal with what is known as clean meat. Clean meat is grown in laboratories from animal cells. This could mean a possibility for Jewish cuisine that had previously seemed impossible: kosher bacon.

Clean meat, also known as “cell-based agriculture,” begins with cells taken from an animal, often stem cells that are put into a solution that mimics blood and encourages the cells to replicate.

Mission Barns is the start-up in Berkeley focused on creating animal fat (where the distinctive flavor of meat comes from). They have created duck sausages, but duck breast or steak is expected to take much longer.

Why It’s Hot: Both environmentalists and animal activists are proponents of the technology because it could product the flavor of meat without animal suffering and greenhouse gases. Jewish authorities hope it will make kosher meat more affordable and reliable. Clean meat is not available in stores yet, but start-ups are currently working on it and say it could be available by next year. And when it is, they want a kosher stamp on their product, which indicates it adheres to quality and preparation standards and follows a set of biblical laws.