Eco-Friendly Homes (For Real)

Eco-friendly, element-resistant, and cost-effective homes are coming soon (maybe). A startup called Geoship has conceptualized homes that are element resistant, energy efficient, non-toxic, and basically zero-waste producing homes made out of bioceramic materials.

But the concept goes beyond the physical home. Affordability is a major concern for the company, so they’re proposing community land trusts where groups of people will be able to design their own communities on one plot of land rather than the traditional one home land ownership model.

Part of the concept is creating a cooperative ownership model where customers will end up owning 30% to 70% of the company. But as great as this sounds, the company is still fundraising for the first production plant, estimating at least 2 years before anything is actually made.

At the bottom of their website, they have explanations of what they mean by “efficient” “non-toxic,” etc.

Example: “By “Efficient” we mean bioceramic geodesic homes will save you money. Turnkey price estimates (including land, delivery, installation, and finishing touches) for Geoship homes range from $55,000 for a tiny home, to $250,000 for a large home. In many cases this will be at least a 50% reduction in mortgage and utility bills compared to a conventional home. We are confident that our technology enables the leap onto a new affordability curve, but pricing will not be set until production begins. Geoship villages will optionally include solar panels, battery packs, and passive solar heating/cooling to reduce energy bills.”

Why it’s hot:

The idea in and of itself is hot because 1. it sounds almost too good to be true 2. it kind of gives off Fyre Fest energy and 3. nothing has actually been built, but I thought a particularly interesting part of this is was it’s newest partner, Zappos. Historically, retail companies haven’t been leading eco-tech conversations, but Zappos is actually the first brand to hop on board with their initiative of creating a “village” of these domes to house some of the homeless population in Las Vegas. It will be interesting to not only see if this works, but also if they will start flooding the housing market.

You can read more on the Geoship website and this Fast Co. article.