Mastercard Demystified Millennials

Millennials seem to be the toughest demographic to crack, as they’re viewed as narcissistic, entitled, superficial, and several more descriptive adjectives. So Mastercard Australia made it their mission to understand what millennials really wanted from their new debit rewards program. The “Millennials Demystified” experiment was conducted by researchers at the University of South Wales and the purpose was simple, to find out what millennials really desire. Participants of the study were given 2 choices in which they had to choose which one they desired the most, the catch was that their neurological impulses let the researchers know exactly what they truly desired out of the two choices. The results? Simple. Millennials are human after all and they want to do more good than harm the world, contrary to what seems to be common belief.

Why it’s hot:
Turns out millennials aren’t soulless zombies that want to watch the world burn.

Mastercard AU

Breakthrough Bacterial “Live Ink” Developed For 3D Printing

ETH Zurich, a science & tech university, has announced the development of a new kind of ink that contains live bacteria. This ink has fantastic implications for several areas of science, including cleaning up environmental pollution and creating medical supplies.

For environmental pollution, the ink is key because it suspends bacteria in a polymer hydrogel, which keeps the bacteria alive and fed for a time. Once the bacteria eat all of the hydrogel, it can begin to process other materials – for example, toxins in water. ETH Zurich researchers printed a live ink grid embedded with bacteria that eat the hazardous chemical phenol, and then put the lattice in phenol-contaminated water. The water was completely purified in just a few days.

For medical supplies, this ink is important not because of the bacteria itself, but because of the strands of material that the bacteria create when they move: bacterial cellulose. Bacterial cellulose is pure, holds a lot of water, and is soothing to wounds on human flesh. And it’s a natural material, so human bodies generally don’t reject the cellulose. As a result, this material is perfect for materials like skin transplants and wound dressings. Until now, bacterial cellulose could only be grown in flat sheets, which isn’t conducive to the contours of bodies – but now with this 3D ink, researchers can print cellulose in the shape of someone’s elbow, or face, or ankle, etc.

Why It’s Hot: There are SO many possible applications of this technology. 3D printing is relatively easy to access, and there are a million kinds of bacteria (unscientific estimation) that could be used and modified to achieve a multitude of goals. For example, researchers are already eyeing bacteria that could be genetically modified to secrete medicine to speed wound healing, and before you know it we’ll all be buying bacterially enhanced Band-Aids!

Read more: The Verge | Science News

Parker the stuffed bear

Say Hi to Parker, your augmented reality bear. He’s filled with nothing but love and stuffing but he’s so much more than that. When you purchase Parker for $60 you can get the whole Parker kit that’s compatible with your iOS devices! It comes with Parker, a wooden stethoscope, wooden thermometer and a few other miscellaneous items. The idea is to promote STEAM from a young age.

It’s a great way to integrate AR with a classic toy for kids. The greatest part is that you can also purchase the $40 extension bedtime kit for more fun! Purchases aside, at least the app itself is free.

Why it’s hot:

STEAM integration is becoming more and more important and it’s an amazing way to let kids explore from the get go. But is Parker worth $100?

source: https://www.macworld.com/article/3236200/ios/parker-your-augmented-reality-bear.html

This video game is also an ADHD prescription medicine

Akili Interactive just announced incredible results from a pivotal study of their investigational digital medicine, AKL-T01, aka a VIDEO GAME, in treating pediatric ADHD. This sounds bonkers but it’s true, I swear.

In a randomized, controlled trial of 348 kids and teenagers with ADHD, AKL-T01 showed a statistically significant improvement compared to an active control on the primary goal of changing the subjects’ Attention Performance Index, a measure of ADHD symptoms. With these study results in hand, Akili plans to file AKL-T01 with the FDA for clearance as a novel treatment for pediatric ADHD.

AKL-T01 is built on Akili’s proprietary Project: EVO tech platform that “enables selective targeting and activation of specific cognitive neural systems in the brain that exhibit deficiencies from various medical conditions” (BusinessWire). Basically, the game uses algorithms to deliver stimuli that engage targeted neural systems in the brain, and the algorithms automatically adjust the level, aka dose, of stimuli depending on the particular patient. The treatment looks and feels like a video game, with art, music, storytelling, and rewards to keep kids engaged for maximum compliance.

Why It’s Hot: IT’S A VIDEO GAME THAT IS ALSO A PRESCRIPTION FOR CHANGING NEURAL PATHWAYS IN PEOPLE. That is bonkers. If the FDA approves this as a medication, and the platform is expanded to treat other brain/neurological disorders, the possibilities are endless.

Learn More: BusinessWire | Reuters

Apple Watch Gains Momentum as Key AFib Diagnosis Tool

Two developments this week are putting Apple Watch front & center in the ongoing search for better atrial fibrillation (AFib) diagnostic and management tools. AFib is a condition where your heartbeat is irregular, and it often has zero symptoms and goes undiagnosed. It’s currently the leading cause of strokes, and related deaths and hospitalizations, in the US.

First, the FDA has cleared the first EKG band as a direct-to-consumer – meaning, you don’t need a prescription to purchase or use it – Apple Watch accessory. The KardiaBand, a device made by startup AliveCor, can capture your EKG in 30 seconds. The band’s algorithms can then detect whether signs of AFib are present in the EKG. The band also makes use of the Apple Watch’s heartbeat sensors and will alert you if your watch is picking up fast or irregular heartbeats, and prompt you to complete an EKG test on the spot to further analyze any symptoms you may be feeling.

Second, Stanford has launched an irregular heartbeat study using the Apple Watch and an app available on the App Store called Apple Heart Study. Users just download the app and consent to participate, and then their data is automatically collected and analyzed by Stanford. If AFib is detected, the app will send you a push notification as well as provide a free consultation with a Stanford doctor and an EKG patch for further monitoring. With Apple’s recent release of HealthKit and ResearchKit, this study is another step toward positioning the Apple Watch as a versatile, reliable health monitoring device.

Why It’s Hot: These two developments are cracking the facade of a time-honored medical tradition of keeping information about your own body behind expert oversight. The KardiaBand being direct-to-consumer indicates a big step forward in companies being able to build hardware and software that rival medical technology to a level that the FDA will approve it. And the Stanford study is working directly with Apple Watch users, not requiring any subjects to go into a medical facility for testing and data gathering. Is this the first step toward breaking down the expert oversight firewall? But of course, on the other hand, what are the ramifications of people’s health data being shared and stored on their devices?

Learn More: EKG band | Stanford study

FDA Approves First-Ever Digital Pill

The FDA has approved a pill called Abilify MyCite that can digitally track whether it’s been ingested, and when. The point of the medication is to increase patient compliance, the thought being that if the patient is being held accountable by their medication, they’ll be more likely to take their pills. Non-compliance is a huge issue – not only does it decrease patient outcomes, it’s also can create drug resistance, and in the case of overdosing, can create dangerous drug dependency.

The pill works via a sensor in the actual pill made of copper and magnesium that sends out an electric signal once the sensor hits the stomach acid. The patient wears a patch on their ribcage that receives the electric signal, and sends it along to an app that records the date and time of the pill digestion. The app allows for data sharing with doctors and family members (and sharing permissions can be revoked at any time).

Though the technology is promising, there are big ethical questions raised by this new pill. First, Abilify is an antipsychotic medication prescribed primarily to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The FDA’s approving of this particular kind of medication reflects a concerning disregard for the mental wellbeing of patients – Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman told The New York Times, “there’s an irony in it being giving to people with mental disorders that can include delusions. It’s like a biomedical Big Brother.” And his colleague Dr. Paul Appelbaum, Columbia’s director of law, ethics and psychiatry, pointed out that “drugs for almost any other condition would be a better place to start than a drug for schizophrenia.”

Second, the authority figures wielding this level of surveillance could easily manipulate patients. Imagine being told that your insurance company will cover 100% of your pill costs, but only if you take it on time every day. Or that you’re on parole and your freedom is contingent on taking medication. Or that your release from a psychiatric institution is predicated on your drug adherence.

Why It’s Hot: The technology itself is exciting – and the potential implications are fascinatingly broad, from improving patient outcomes to providing a whole new way for authorities to exert control over your physical being. (Yikes.)

Learn more: EngadgetNew York Times

 

Sideways dictionary is like a friend who knows more about technology than you…

…and is really good at explaining it in fun, and sometimes weird, analogies.

This project, a collaboration between The Washington Post and Google’s Jigsaw, offers users the chance to look up technology and information security terms like “Blockchain” and “OAuth” and have them explained without technical jargon or nerdy derision. For instance, “Machine Learning” is described as:

It’s like the game Pictionary. If you have to draw a sheep, you don’t spend three days crafting a photo-realistic, intricately textured representation of a particular breed. You sketch the basic defining characteristics – fluffy body, four legs, head – and hope your team-mate isn’t overly literal. 

Users can add analogies and up-vote existing examples they found interesting or helpful. So if “It’s like the Berners Street hoax that took place in London in 1810” doesn’t immediately help you understand “DDoS Attack,” then maybe “It’s like 20 sumo wrestlers trying to get through a revolving door at the same time” will make more sense.

Why it’s hot

Knowing more about technical terms helps when information security is on the line, and Sideways Dictionary ensures that anyone can start from wherever they are in technical know-how. It might not teach you the ins and outs of how to use a VPN to protect your credentials, but it will at least make sure you understand that a “Virtual Private Network is like Harry Potter and his Cloak of Invisibility.”

EPA Approves Trial of Mosquitoes as Biopesticides

The EPA just approved the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to fight mosquito-borne diseases. MosquitoMate, a biotech startup, has created mosquitoes with a modification that inhibits the reproductive cycle of mosquitoes in the wild. The goal is to introduce a natural (well, natural-ish) method of fighting diseases like Zika and dengue fever that are historically quite difficult to control, especially in zones where mosquito activity is high.

The GMO mosquitoes are given a bacterium to carry – Wolbachia pipienti – with the goal of spreading the bacterium to the wild populations of Asian tiger mosquitoes, the kind of mosquito that carries diseases. MosquitoMate breeds the infected bugs in their lab, and then separates the specimens into males and females. The males, who don’t bite, are released into treatment areas. When the GMO males mate with wild females, their eggs don’t hatch because of the bacterium (it prevents the paternal chromosome from forming correctly). Therefore, the mosquito circle of life is short-circuited after 30 to 40 days, the average lifespan of Asian tiger mosquitoes.

The EPA only okayed MosquitoMate to release their males into 20 states and DC, because those zones are most similar in climate to the three locations where the startup held its tests (KY, NY, and CA). MosquitoMate hopes to be able to iterate on their concept and create a different species that can be released all over the US.

Why It’s Hot: Not all biotech has to be complex or cutting-edge technologically. This startup, and the bacterium-carrying mosquito as biopesticide strategy overall, is pretty low-tech in terms of its mechanisms and functionality, but it has massive potential to improve public health and safety, not to mention general quality of life, for millions of people. Not everything has to be complicated in order to be groundbreaking!

Read More: Engadget | NatureMosquitoMate

 

Machine learning as film critic

While identifying a Wes Anderson movie is probably something many moviegoers could do without complex AI, the creator of a new machine learning program called Machine Visions is hoping he can learn more about what makes an auteur’s works distinct.

[Yannick] Assogba uses four of Anderson’s films as source for his project — The Life AquaticThe Royal Tenenbaums, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Moonrise Kingdom — from which he extracts a frame every 10 seconds, for a sample of 2,309 frames in total.

Assogba investigates color and recurring motifs in Anderson’s works, drawing out themes from the machine learning much faster than a human would be able to watch and process the images.

The Life Aquatic pixel grid

Each frame that the program analyzed from The Life Aquatic is displayed as a single pixel in this grid

Why It’s Hot

Machine visions not only provides an interesting way to look at film and cinematography through the lens of technology, it provides a detailed and accessible framework for starting to understand machine learning. By introducing people to machine learning through art and pop culture, Assogba gives both technical and non-technical people a reason to explore further.

“It can suggest similarities and juxtapositions for a human to look at, some are ones we would find ourselves while others might be surprising or poetic because of imperfections in the algorithms and models.”

Learn more  i-DMashable | Machine Visions

Biotech startup Taxa debuts genetically engineered fragrant moss

Taxa, a biotech startup in Silicon Valley, has debuted a new product: Orbella, a line of three fragrant mosses genetically engineered to give off aromas of patchouli, linalool (floral, clean, and fresh), and geraniol (rose-like). The project is a textbook example of synthetic biology, or synbio, which is the application of engineering techniques to the building blocks of life. (Basically, creating new life forms.)

Orbella was produced through a collaboration between Taxa and Dr. Henrik Simonsen, a professor at the University of Copenhagen whose work focuses on using photosynthesis (as opposed to conventional chemical synthesis) to biosynthesize small molecules.

The scented mosses were created by taking genes associated with a certain scent and splicing them into the moss genes. The actual process sounds like a near-future sci fi plot point: the scientists design the spliced gene online, use a gene gun (real name) to insert the genes into the moss cells, and then grow the GMO moss in liquid form.

If you’ve heard of Taxa before, it’s probably because of their intensely controversial Glowing Plant Kickstarter project. Back in 2013, Taxa successfully funded the Glowing Plant project with the promise of delivering a genetically modified plant that’d glow in the dark. Problem is, the biotech required to actually produce the glowing plant proved to be beyond Taxa’s reach, and their actual product hardly emitted any light.

Regardless of the success (or not) of the Glowing Plant itself, the Kickstarter project faced heavy blowback amid concerns of GMO products hitting consumer markets without any regulatory oversight. Prompted by the Glowing Plant controversy, Kickstarter banned GMO projects shortly thereafter. Taxa then pivoted to fragrant moss, which is much easier to engineer due to its simpler genome and shorter life-cycle, which allows scientists to run experiments more quickly.

Why It’s Hot: Orbella is a step forward in the consumer-facing biotech sphere. Taxa’s hope is that the product helps to positively change people’s perception of GMOs and demonstrate the varied uses of the emerging technology. Taxa is also funded primarily through crowd funding, and they’re an independent biotech company – their work is proving that GMO products don’t have to be the sole purview of massive conglomerates.

More significantly, though, the synbio field is truly the future of biotech, and represents mind-bogglingly vast possibilities for humanity – along with equally vast moral and ethical quandaries. How much modification is too much? Where’s the line between a fun, harmless GMO like scented moss and something more troubling? And who should be allowed to produce, and sell, and purchase GMO products in the first place?

Orbella Moss: Gizmodo | Business InsiderOrbella Moss
The Glowing Plant project: Kickstarter | Mother Jones | The Verge

NASA’s Cassini probe ends its 20 year journey

The Cassini space probe vaporized early in the morning on Friday, September 15, as it hurled itself into Saturn’s atmosphere and broke apart, losing connection to the NASA team monitoring it. This was as planned, in order to protect planetary system from potentially harmful microbes the probe might carry from Earth.

Still, it was an emotional time for everyone involved, as many have been working with this spacecraft for decades. Launched in 1997, Cassini traveled seven years through and across 2.2 billion miles of space to reach Saturn. It then spent more than a decade whirling around the planet and flying close by the many moons in the system, gathering data and making discoveries that many at NASA never even expected. Perhaps Cassini’s biggest revelation was the fact that Enceladus has a global ocean underneath its crust, one that could be habitable. The vehicle has also taught us much about the unique nature of Titan, showing that the moon has lakes and rivers of methane on its surface

Scientists still need to decode the data sent from Cassini, and it could be years before we understand exactly what the probe saw.

Why it’s hot

Even non-scientists are enraptured by the end of Cassini’s journey, getting caught up in the emotion of destroying a probe after 20 years of exploration. Capturing people’s awe at our universe and shared experiences like this is a powerful way to tell a story.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/9/15/16308334/nasa-cassini-spacecraft-saturn-titan-enceladus-dive-destruction

What the eclipse can teach us about science

While people across the country are racing to find safety glasses and make last-minute travel arrangements, scientists are making other preparations. These are just some of the natural phenomena that will tested with the help of this week’s solar eclipse:

Einstein’s theory of relativity

Einstein’s 1915 theory says that massive objects should warp the shape of space itself by a noticeable amount. Something like the Sun should bend the light from the constellations behind it, making the stars look as if they’ve moved over a teeny bit.

 

Learning more about the sun’s corona

The sun’s corona, “the bright, high-energy plasma blasting off the Sun’s surface” is the source of space weather, as well as energy particles that “can cause wild auroras, harm satellites, or potentially even swap votes in voting machines should they hit electronics in the right place.” A special telescope, which blocks out most of the sun for the viewer, is used to observe the corona, but eclipses allow scientists to get more precise images of the corona itself. Scientists will be observing the corona from the ground as well as from hot air balloons.

Plant and animal behavior

Unexpected darkness in a plant or animal’s habitat could allow scientists to study their reactions. Many plants and animals behave differently in the run-up or wake of natural disasters, will they show any new behavior during the eclipse?

The effect on weather in different climate zones

“The eclipse will be passing over several different ecosystems, including forests, farmland, and prairies.” Professional scientists, as well as citizen scientists, are preparing to record the temperature throughout the eclipse in St. Louis and the surrounding area.

Why it’s hot

There’s still much about the world we have yet to learn, and a natural phenomenon like the eclipse gives us a unique perspective to measure and observe. It’s something to be excited about that isn’t horrible!

To see other experiments, and to learn how to set up your own for the eclipse, see the full article at Gizmodo

Augmented reality without glasses

Diagram of artificial lense

Artificial lens diagram via techcrunch.com

Six months ago, Omega Ophthalmics did a small trial of seven patients outside of the US. Their goal was to test for adverse effects of a surgery similar to lens replacements that often accompany cataract removals. The difference? Rather than replacing the cloudy lens with a normal artificial lens, surgeons instead implanted a lens that could be used for augmented reality, interactive sensors, or drug delivery.

Why it’s hot

Although widespread adoption of this technology is unlikely in the near future, scientists, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists hope that there is a market for such implants in an aging population that wants to be independent for longer. Whether this small trial is successful may pave the way for larger trials to test additional possibilities and risk.

Learn more at TechCrunch.com

student teacher…

An 11 year old Tennessee girl recently found a way to instantly detect lead in water, cutting the time it used to take to do so drastically. Previously, you had to take a water sample and send it off to a lab for analysis, now all you need is her contraption and a smartphone. She discovered her solution when she read about a new type of nanotechnology on MIT’s website, and imagined its new application in its new context.

Here’s how it works:
“Her test device, which she has dubbed “Tethys,” uses a disposable cartridge containing chemically treated carbon nanotube arrays. This connects with an Arduino technology-based signal processor with a Bluetooth attachment. The graphene within the nanotube is highly sensitive to changes in flow of current. By treating the tube with atoms that are sensitive to lead, Rao is able to measure whether potable water is contaminated with lead, beaming the results straight to a Bluetooth-enabled smartphone. When it detects levels higher than 15 parts per million, the device warns that the water is unsafe.”

Why it’s hot:

1) Never let “can we do this” stop you
2) Never let “how can we do this” stop you
3) Some of the best solutions come when you put two (or more) things together

This offers a good lesson in a few important ingredients for innovation – how much you care, how much you believe, and how creative you can be. When all are high, you can create amazing things. Know what’s possible, believe that anything is, and let nothing stop you. Let’s do it.

DNA to replace your flash drive?

Data storage of the future: DNA. Researchers were able to recreate and store a short film into bacterial DNA and then retrieve it! With the use of Crispr, a powerful gene editing technique they were able to create this masterpiece in some good ‘ol E. coli.

Since there has been buzz around data storage being a growing issue this “futuristic feature” may be the new method of data storage. The intended purpose wasn’t to store movies but instead, researchers hope to be able to program bacteria as recording devices that can drift into the brain through the blood stream and essentially take notes. It would work similarly to airplane black boxes that are used to retrieve information in the event of a crash.

Why it’s hot:

There are so many possibilities. If DNA can store data like this, imagine what it could do for doctors and researchers. Feeling a little ill and not entirely sure what the issue is? Perhaps your doctor can retrieve the information directly from inside of you.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/12/science/film-clip-stored-in-dna.html

When will AI outperform humans at work?

352 AI experts forecast a 50% chance AI will outperform humans in all tasks within 45 years, and take all jobs from humans within 120 years. Many of the world’s leading experts on machine learning were among those they contacted, including Yann LeCun, director of AI research at Facebook, Mustafa Suleyman from Google’s DeepMind and Zoubin Ghahramani, director of Uber’s AI labs.


Get the full research document HERE. Go to page 14 to get details on predictions

School Subjects Could Be A Thing Of The Past in Finland

Finland is rethinking how it teaches in the digital age – seeking to place skills, as much as subjects, at the heart of what it does in a framework called Project Based Learning (PBL)

VIDEO: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-39889523

WHY ITS HOT

Traditionally, learning has been defined as a list of subject matters and facts you need to acquire – such as arithmetic and grammar – with some decoration, like citizenship, built in around it.

When it comes to real life, our brain is not sliced into disciplines in that way; we are thinking in a very holistic way. And when you think about the problems in the world – global crises, migration, the economy, the post-truth era – we really haven’t given our children the tools to deal with this inter-cultural world.

It’s a major mistake if we lead children to believe the world is simple and that if they learn certain facts they are ready to go. So learning to think, learning to understand, these are important skills – and it also makes learning fun, which we think promotes wellbeing.

Never fear splitting your pants wide open ever again

A company called Imperial Motion has released a line of outerwear and bags that incorporates nano technology. The special material self-heals when torn by rubbing two fingers over the puncture back and forth for about 10 seconds.

Link to Imperial Motion’s Nano Cure line

Why It’s Hot

This is a great practical application of a once-excessively hyped technology. In addition to being a great idea, it seems to be very reasonably priced.

In Two Shakes of a Lamb’s Tail We’ll be Growing Humans in Fluid Filled Bags

So we’re able to let Lambs develop outside the womb.

Physicians at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia worked with 23 week-old lambs to in order test a synthetic device that imitates a woman’s uterus, hoping to limit mortality and disease in premature children that are born before 37 weeks.

Premature birth is the leading cause of death for newborns. So it makes sense that we try to find a solution, albeit a creepy looking one. In this successful breakthrough, lambs were placed in transparent biobags just 105 days after they started development, which is equivalent to about 22 weeks of human development.

The lambs were kept in the biobags for four weeks. During this time, they grew hair; their lungs developed; and they reached the point where they could survive on their own.

Remarkably, the eight lambs in the trial developed normally in the artificial womb and each survived, proving that the biobag successfully mimicked the natural conditions found in the uterus—and paving the way for a new life-saving device for humans.

Although the fluid-filled plastic enclosure can’t develop a child for an entire nine-month term, it can allow us to incubate them remarkably soon after conception. The team of physicians is already in talks with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and clinical trials are slated to begin in the next 3 to 5 years.

Image result for the matrix image coming out of the goo

Read more here.

Why it’s hot:

  1. ‘Cause this new device could allow premature babies to develop in natural conditions and maybe avoid a host of chronic health conditions.

We All Could Benefit From The Japanese Practice of Forest Bathing

The Japanese practice of forest bathing or is proven to lower heart rate and blood pressure, reduce stress hormone production, boost the immune system, and improve overall feelings of wellbeing.

From 2004 to 2012, Japanese officials spent about $4 million dollars studying the physiological and psychological effects of forest bathing, designating 48 therapy trails based on the results. Forest environments can be viewed as therapeutic landscapes.

Forest bathing works easily: Just be with trees. No hiking, no counting steps on a Fitbit. You can sit or meander, but the point is to relax rather than accomplish anything.

WHY ITS HOT:

It’s only recently in human history that we stopped being outside, spending 80% of our time in doors and most of our time in 2D environments. With the onslaught of more screens, AI, virtual reality et al – Its more important than ever for us to understand how our environments effect us, and what we need to not only be happy, but what we need to unlock creativity, empathy, self love, and healing.

More from the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2015/09/14/how-tech-workers-are-turning-to-the-japanese-practice-of-forest-bathing-to-break-their-smartphone-habits/?utm_term=.c91df83b644d

AI and the Rise of the Useless Class?

 

In 2004, MIT and Harvard published a report on automation in the job market – they predicted that truck driving could not undergo automation – but now Google and Tesla are working on it. Until recently, facial recognition was also a favorite example of something that babies accomplish easily but which escaped even the most powerful computers. Today, facial-recognition programs are able to identify people far more efficiently and quickly than humans can.

We’ve had evidence for awhile that AI is coming for things that we thought only humans could do.

An Oxford study in 2013 surveyed the likelihood of different professions being taken over by computer algorithms within the next 20 years. Just as example, they predict these professions have over an 80% chance or higher of being eliminated by AI – Sports Refs, Cashiers, Chefs, Waiters, Paralegal, Tour Guides, Bakers, Bus Drivers, Construction Workers, Security Guards, Sailors.

So what does this mean?

Traditionally, life has been divided into two main parts: a period of learning, followed by a period of working. Very soon this traditional model will become utterly obsolete, and the only way for humans to stay in the game will be to keep learning throughout their lives and to reinvent themselves repeatedly. Many, if not most, humans may be unable to do so.

Enter the idea of a “useless class” of people. The prediction is, just as mass industrialization created the working class, the AI revolution will create a new unworking class.

Why Its Hot / Questions To Think About:

1. Today, work has been the standard way to valuing your time/contribution to society – if that goes away, what else could we be doing that builds societal value?
2. If the gap between people that create and people that consume widens, how will we value the sacredness of life and human experiences?
3. What exactly should be the role of AI in modern life? Is it to eliminate work, or would this change over time?
4. Professionally, how do we continue to level up? How will our own work change?

 

 

The rise of the useless class

what we should eat is defined by our DNA

A startup called Habit is providing personalized nutrition/diet plans and meals based on customers’ DNA. For $299, with few drops of blood and saliva, scientists and nutritionists can tailor nutritional advice specified to your biological make up – what food your body craves, rejects, etc.

Once customers’ metabolic and DNA analyses are gathered, Habit also recommends individual’s health goals through its Nutrition Intelligence Engine algorithm to place them into one of seven Habit types. Each type has different plan specifies the ideal ratio of carbs, protein, and fat in each meal in addition to the TYPES of carbs, protein, and fat their body will respond best to.

Meal plans and access to health coach are further complemented by personalized meals that are delivered fresh to your door – for extra cost of course. Working with biometric devices such as Fitbit, participants can use their devices to monitor their progress and enable Habit staff to input any changes to plans/meals as needed.

Why it’s HOT:

  • this is a business model around hyper personalization, based on individual biological make up, can’t get more personal that this.
  • there will be the growth of converging science/nutrition/data to create consumer facing products and services.
  • Habit was valued at $210 bil by Morgan Stanley Research for its meal-delivery services – with the potential to disrupt and clearly differentiate itself from Blue Apron and other food delivery services.

Want me to dance? Code me

Hasbro is trying to teach kids to code in a unique way. They are launching a Belle doll that pairs with a basic programming app for iOS or Android. The doll teaches kids the fundamentals of coding all in the name of getting Belle to dance. Kids can program dance routines through Belle’s companion app

Whether your child is younger or older, this doll can help gear a child’s mind towards coding. For the younger kids, you can program Belle’s movements with a basic connect-the-dots mode, where the screen is filled with shapes that coincide with basic dance moves. When a child drags their finger across the shapes on the screen, in whatever pattern they choose, Belle dances in conjunction with the selected commands. For older kids, you can use the “block coding” mode where you can drag and drop moves and commands into a sequence for Belle to perform. The doll pairs over Bluetooth and relies on batteries for power. Belle costs $120 and will be available in the fall 2017.

While it won’t necessarily make them computer geniuses overnight, it will help them develop problem solving skills, give them an interest in how things work on a fundamental level, and likely increase a child’s interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)

Why it’s hot
More girls in STEM please – Girls have historically been far more likely to stray away from STEM education and careers. Women make up half of the total U.S. college-educated workforce, but only 29% of the science and engineering workforce. So, it’s encouraging to see toy companies making an effort to welcome more little girls into the STEM community.