New Study finds generous makes you happy, and makes your kids generous

Study finds that parents who give money to charity could see a lifelong benefit for their own kids. Children in families with strong philanthropic traditions are more likely to grow up acting generously–and be seemingly happier for it.

In a small study from Fidelity Charitable, a public charity that manages the largest donor-advised fund program in the country, the organization questioned 3,000 people who donate to charity and itemize deductions on their tax returns. People who grew up with strong family traditions around giving ended up more likely than those who didn’t (45% to 36%) to donate $5,000 or more of their own money annually to charity.

Other positive correlations: Family-inspired givers volunteer more time (89% to 73%), consider themselves closer to their immediate family (81% to 71%), and rate themselves as “very happy” far more often (48% to 33%) than those who grew up without such influence. Fidelity sees these correlations as proof that there’s something positive happening, and just in time for the holiday season. “We’ve always known that strategic philanthropy benefits the charities donors support, but this study proves that the impact goes beyond that,” says its president, Pamela Norley, in a press release. “Giving makes people happier and is a significant contributor to a happier and healthy family too.”

Fidelity’s findings line up with similar academic research. According to a 2017 study published in the journal Nature Communications, there’s a virtuous cycle around altruism: “Generous behavior is known to increase happiness, which could thereby motivate generosity,” note researchers at the University of Zurich. To show that, the group asked 50 people to rank their mood, and then gave them a small sum (about $25 in francs) to spend each week for a month. The group divided into people that were told to spend the money on themselves, and those who gave it away to others.

The more generous givers reported improved moods and showed more activity in the reward center of their brain during subsequent fMRI scans. That sort of test has been replicated many times with different amounts and far larger sample sizes, and in some instances may even be related to reduced blood pressure. The key isn’t necessarily the amount–benefits in some experiments have been charted at just $5. Although if you have at least $5,000 to donate, that’s good for Fidelity: It happens to be the minimum requirement to open a giving account.

Why it’s hot: This is an awesome insight into generosity and human happiness and could make us as marketers think differently about inspiring behavior change.

Source: FastCo

i’ll brt, thanks to easyJet…

Anyone who’s on Instagram has undoubtedly come across a photo and wondered – “where is that, and how do I get there”? Probably on a daily basis. Thanks to easyJet’s new app feature, now you can find out, and book a flight there in a couple of taps.

According to the company – “Simply take a screenshot of a European destination you like the look of and upload it to Look&Book in our app. We’ll then tell you where it is and which flights will get you there.” 

Why it’s hot:

While it’s a great example of turning a ubiquitous behavior into a simple utility, more importantly, it’s another signal that image recognition technology is about to become commonplace.

Fine Art Therapy

Image result for art therapy

Doctor’s in Montreal will be able to prescribe free museum visits to patients suffering from a range of illnesses. Patients suffering from depression to diabetes or chronic illnesses will be given up to 50 free visit passes for patients and caregivers.

 

In the 21st century, culture will be what physical activity was for health in the 20th century,” predicts Nathalie Bondil, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts director general, in the Montreal Gazette.

The Art Hive, an initiative from the museum, is just one example of what Bondil says is one part of the future of health care. With an on staff art therapist and the collaboration of physicians The Hive is open to people who want to explore the curative effects of art, whether it be creation or simply its presence.

 “There’s more and more scientific proof that art therapy is good for your physical health. It increases our level of cortisol and our level of serotonin. We secrete hormones when we visit a museum and these hormones are responsible for our well-being.”

Much like exercise, art can improve wellness for all types and ages of patients.

Source: https://qz.com/1433682/doctors-in-montreal-will-start-prescribing-visits-to-the-art-museum/

Why it’s hot:

It’s great to see doctors collaborating with other fields to find solutions for health issues that are beyond prescriptions.

Avocado Isn’t Toast

Perhaps because its perfectly instgrammable or because its significantly more satisfying than the toll of homeownership, either way, avocados have become an everyday staple. In fact, we eat four times more avocados today than we did ten years ago and to keep up with the demand, over 80% of avocados consumed in the U.S. are imported from Mexico.

Avocados from Mexico, is capitalizing on the insatiable need for their product by making the recipes on their website shoppable. Now, shoppers can indulge in their habit by choosing from a host of delivery partners – Amazon Fresh, PeaPod, or Walmart Grocery – to get all the ingredients needed to make anything that calls for everyone’s favorite berry. Avocados views shoppable recipes as a service to its own customers, rather than a way to win some of the e-commerce pie.

By garnering customer demographics and preferences, Avocados from Mexico will use machine learning to deliver better, more personalized content to consumers. “We’ve been working very hard in the past to try to get as much data as possible from our consumers,” said Alvaro Luque, president and CEO of Avocados From Mexico . “We’ve been building a very robust CRM system to get them as close as we can to our brand. Every deep investment we can do will help us build this big database we are trying to develop.” Luque said more data will help the company understand the e-commerce preferences of consumers and enhance the customer experience. Avocados From Mexico can determine a metric that is very close to ROI by comparing the cost of its ad campaign with the total value of the products moved to shopping carts, said the company.

While most other grocery products don’t share the same fame as avocados do and can’t expect consumers to visit their site to discover more, building consumer relationships (or more bluntly: gathering consumer data) is especially important to maintain relevance in Amazon’s latest sector play.

Why its hot: Elevating customer experience through personalized content is no longer reserved for high price point products, but rather has become table stakes. Are avocados doing a better job at CX than your brand? 

Source: Digiday

Vertical TV

Snapchat is producing interactive, original, scripted video shows called Snap Originals.

It released 12 original shows, spanning the comedy, horror and reality genres, among others. Each show has been created with established TV producers. For example Snapchat’s mystery thriller, Class of Lies, was created by Riverdale’s producers; Endless Summer, a reality show about socialites from Laguna Beach, was created by Bunim/Murray, the company behind Keeping Up with the Kardashians.

The shows are shot in portrait, to fit the Snapchat platform, and feature overlaid graphics, split screens and quick cuts, to suit Snapchat users’ fast-paced mobile behaviour. Users can find the shows in Snapchat’s discover area, as well as on the Show Profile page that is made available through Snapchat search. Snapchat also gives users the option to sign up to push notifications telling them when a new episode or piece of content is released.

Users can also activate the new ‘portals’ function by swiping their screen. This function uses augmented reality technology to allow viewers step inside a scene of the show and explore it for themselves.

Each show will also have its own Lenses and filters, creating more ways for viewers to incorporate the shows in their own Snaps

Snap Originals will be, well, snappy. Each episode will be as short as four or five minutes in length. Unlike Netflix shows which are either made available one series at a time or uploaded weekly, Snap Originals will have daily episodes.

Why its hot?
True to the brand 
Snap Originals will be, well, snappy. Each episode will be as short as four or five minutes in length.
Anti-Binge
Unlike Netflix shows which are either made available one series at a time or uploaded weekly, Snap Originals will have daily episodes.
Don’t watch from outside. Get inside the story
Portal lenses allow a user to take out their phone, open their camera, open the portal, literally get off their couch, walk into the scene, look around, and be in a show

Friends For Your Grandparents

ElliQ is a proactive social robot, designed to not only interact with older adults, but also to engage them. By suggesting activities and connection to loved ones, the robot creates a more human-like connection something other voice-assisted technologies still struggle with.

Why it’s hot: Harnessing the power of voice-powered assistance to deliver value to a generation that likely needs it the most.

849 miles long drive thru

Popeyes has launched a pop-up drive-thru just outside of Fort Stockton in Texas. Once customers have placed their order, however, they’re told to pick it up in New Orleans – a 12-hour drive away. Anyone who makes the trip will receive their fried-chicken feast in New Orleans for free.

Popeyes is promoting the drive-thru with a video, showing seven chicken fans embarking on the journey to Popeyes’ flagship location in New Orleans.

Along the way, they encounter billboards (and enthusiastic Popeyes employees) indicating how far they have left to go.

Why its hot?

Promoting a functional benefit through a really emotional experience.

The 12-Hour Drive-Thru is designed to highlight the fact that Popeyes’ chicken is marinated for a whole 12 hours before it’s battered and fried.

IHG Used Consumer Insight To Engineer An Efficient, Budget-Friendly Hotel Brand

Hospitality group IHG, owner of sub-brands including Intercontinental, Kimpton and Holiday Inn Hotels, recently expanded its offerings with a new chain, Avid Hotels. Using an elaborate customer segmentation and testing process, IHG identified its target guest, the “Principled Everyday Traveler,” and that traveler’s specific needs. With a no-frills design, Avid Hotels are meant to deliver a seamless customer experience and great night’s sleep without the bells and whistles of a luxury hotel.

VP of Avid Hotels and Mainstream Growth at IHG, expands upon the the hospitality group’s strategy for creating an affordable and reliable hotel experience.

“What we discovered when we did the segmentation study was that there were about 14 million under‑served travelers in the particular segment, and they represent about $20 billion in annual industry revenues. These are travelers that today just don’t have the great travel options. They were telling us that they don’t trust a single brand because there’s so much inconsistency, and so while they find some great hotels out there, they need to do a lot of research to find those hotels. … They’re looking for a brand that they can trust and that’s where Avid can play a large role. To do that, we knew we needed to be disruptive and we really needed to think about the offer in this space to make it work for guests but also to make it work for owners. We’re taking a really different approach to travel in this segment.” This led them to their positioning of “the basic done exceptionally well”.

They will offer their guests an “incredible fitness center”, a “premium coffee experience of bean‑to‑cup coffee that’s available 24 hours a day”, healthful breakfast options, etc. Additionally, their loyalty program will ladder up to IHG’s master brand of Holiday Inn and Kimpton.

Why it’s hot: Many brands are trying to make differentiated hotels for the milenniall “no frills” traveler, so it will be interesting to see if this one sticks!

Source: PSFK

 

 

3D printing of body parts helps reduce surgery length

Formlabs has created a new 3D printing process for modeling real human organs and body parts before surgery.

“The use of 3D printing in medicine allows us to pull the patients’ anatomy off of a computer screen and put it into the physician’s hands,” says Todd Goldstein, director of the 3D Design and Innovation Center at Northwell Health, the hospital network. “This type of technology is a game changer for all parties involved, as it allows for physicians to better visualize the pathology, allows for patients to truly see what treatment is needed, and allows for more precise, patient-specific treatments across almost all specialties.”

The new system, which combines 10 smaller printers with robotics so the process can happen automatically with less involvement from medical staff, can help the hospitals scale up the use of 3D printing. With a 3D model, a surgeon can look at a specific tumor or deformity, for example, and plan exactly how a surgery should proceed before cutting a patient open. That can make an operation safer and also make it shorter; less time on the operating table also means that patients can recover more quickly afterward.

The system, called the Form Cell, takes data from CT and MRI scans and translates them into a replica of a specific body part, which can be used both prior to and during a surgery. “We’re talking about hours saved before a surgery, and even hours in the OR,” says Gaurav Manchanda, director of healthcare at Formlabs. One 2017 study of children’s surgeries found that surgeries were as much as 45 minutes shorter with the use of the models. A study using Northwell data, not yet published, found that using models in complex cases reduced the length of surgeries by about 10%.

Why its hot

3D printing is becoming more and more mainstream thanks to its increasing accessibility. People have more power than ever before. Wearables give us insights into our health that previously could only come from a doctor. With 3D printing, we can download plans straight from the web and create items right in our homes. Maybe one day we can decorate an entire apartment with furniture by downloading the plans from IKEA. This example is just another of many that show how 3D printing is making once complex processes easier, even advanced surgery.

Saving the Trees One Ad View at a Time

65% of people skip pre-roll ads. But Busch Beer’s new “Tree-Roll” ad is giving people a compelling reason to watch to the end. For every full completion view, Busch is planting a tree.

They’ve partnered with the National Forest Foundation as part of the foundation’s effort to plant 50 million trees across America by 2023. For every $1 donated, 1 tree is planted.

The campaign ladders up to Anheuser-Busch’s larger effort to become the industry leader in sustainability.

Why It’s Hot

Besides being a creative way to get people to watch ads all the way through, Busch is hitting on a major area of interest for young Americans by taking a stand on climate change.

Source: https://cassandra.co/marketing/2018/10/25/more-trees-please 

Smart thermometer helps a marketer advertise more effectively

Kinsa is a tech start-up sells internet-connected thermometers that sync up with a smartphone app that allows consumers to track their fevers and symptoms. These capabilities make the app especially attractive to parents of young children.

Kinsa says its thermometers are in more than 500k American households.

This year and last year, Clorox paid Kinsa for access to real-time data on which zip codes around the country are having increases in fevers.

Clorox then pushes more ads to those specific areas assuming that households there may be more likely to buy their products like disinfecting wipes and sprays. They may also pull back ad spending in healthier parts of the country.

So far, consumer interactions with Clorox’s disinfectant ads increased by 22% after using Kinsa’s data to target these digital ads.

The information shared with Clorox was shared in a privacy-compliant manner because Kinsa says no identifying personal information is shared with other companies.

Kinsa says that such data was also sold to pharmacies and drug manufacturers who used this data to stock more cough and cold products in areas that had increases in fevers.

Kinsa said the data provided unique insight into flu-related illness in specific areas. “We can tell you if it’s high or low, whether it’s rising, if it’s bigger than the three- or five- year average, when it’s going to peak and how severe the symptoms are, too,” said the company’s founder.

Why it’s hot: As more products get connected to the internet, it means more consumer data can be collected, which means greater opportunities for advertisers to effectively target their advertising.

Source

Weather Matters in Advertising

Subway is using an artificial intelligence tool from IBM, named WEATHERfx Footfall with Watson, to make ads based on the weather.

The AI uses machine learning to process weather, sales and footfall data collected at Subway outlets. Then, it customizes ads and promotions according to the data.

For example, the tool dropped ads for hot sandwiches during heat waves and instead focused on lighter options.

Results: Subway increased in-store footfall by 31% as a result of WEATHERfx Footfall with Watson. Subway also says it reduced advertising campaign waste by 53%, saving about 7.9 million impressions that ‘would have otherwise gone to waste.’

Link: https://watsonadvertising.ibm.com/news/weatherfx-footfall-with-watson-solution-helped-subway-increase-store-traffic-in-recent-advertising-campaign/

 

 

Coffee Meets Lawsuit

DoNotPay is a Tinder-esque app that helps users file lawsuits and claim awards from class-action settlements.

Instead of funneling through the endless bureaucracy, headache and investment that litigation entails, users can now swipe to sue. The app helps individuals claim everything from remediation from class-action lawsuits to reimbursement for late package delivery. And, the next time your airline kicks you off a flight, or your uber makes a wrong turn, you can be reimbursed for that with a simple tap. While skeptics may see this as an abuse of the legal system, anyone ever wronged by a corporation will finally feel empowered to act and will actually have the representation to do so (since most lawyers won’t talk to you unless your case can yield at least $10,000).

Why its hot: Tapping into native behavior to simplify and democratize access to justice.

Waze Lets Commuters Earn Money By Offering Carpooling Service

Democratizing rideshare services even further, navigation app Waze is testing out a carpool feature that will let regular people pick up passengers along their commute to work or school and earn commission.

With the popularity of services like Uber and Lyft, those looking to supplement their income are increasingly considering ways to capitalize on the booming rideshare industry. Navigation app Waze is currently looking to help commuters earn a little more by letting them pick up passengers to and from work with its recently launched Carpool feature.

There are a few rules in order to keep people from abusing the system: Participants can only partake in two carpools a day, and Waze will verify people’s workplaces through their email. Drivers will be able to choose riders based on their profiles, star ratings, gender, mutual friends status, or whether they are a coworker. Throughout October, the carpool will cost users $2, though afterwards the price will increase to $0.54 per mile.

The app is already in place for several schools and workplaces, including Amazon. The app hopes to take advantage of the democratization of rideshare services as well as appeal to consumer interest in helping reduce pollution and congestion by carpooling.

Why it’s… hot?: This is interesting how a navigation app is getting involved in ride sharing. This makes (slight) sense since this app is already interactive/feeds user data, however it is surprising that they are getting into potential legality issues with this initiative.

Source: PSFK

Personalized Razors, Made Possible by 3-D Printing

Gillette is bringing personalization to the razor industry. Powered by 3-D printers, Gillette and printing company Formlabs have created Razor Maker – a website where you can customize and purchase a razor of your own design.

Gillette’s new Razor Maker™ handles can be printed in seven colors, including black, white, red, blue, green, grey and chrome. (Photo: Business Wire)

The base razors to choose from include 45 intricate designs that are named after their textures, inspired by nature (e.g. Redwood, Coral, Agave). People can customize the color, number of blades, and grip. There’s even an option to add 12 characters of text.

The razors go for $19-$45, with the option to add additional blade cartridges for an extra $15. While the Razor Maker site isn’t currently linked to Gillette’s subscription service Gillette On Demand, it does ask people whether or not they are interested in learning more about the service right before they check out.

Why It’s Hot

With Dollar Shave Club adding new products like shampoo and deodorant to their subscription boxes, and Harry’s Razors launching Flamingo, a new brand of razors and wax strips for women, it’s interesting to see that Gillette is turning to personalization and 3-D printing to stand out from the competition.

More importantly, this is one of the first times a major brand is offering mass customization with 3-D printing. There are endless possibilities that P&G can explore with their other brands, so they may be using Razor Maker as a trial run of the technology with plans to expand in the future.

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181017005532/en/Gillette-Partners-Formlabs-%E2%80%93-Boston-Startup-Defining

 

Who seems to be winning the midterm elections on social media?

The New York Times analyzed data from one month’s (9/15 to 10/15) worth of social media activity by nearly all of the Republican and Democratic candidates running for House, Senate or governor this year. This data came from organic-only public content published to the Facebook and Instagram pages of these candidates.

Measuring total interactions on social media is an imperfect way to gauge a candidate’s electoral chances, in part because it does not distinguish between types of engagement. A negative comment left on a Republican candidate’s page by an angry Democrat would still count as an interaction, for example. In addition, it does not account for the fact that some candidates have more followers than others.

But social media engagement can be a crude measure of popularity, and a bellwether of shifts in public opinion that often turn up in polls days or weeks later. In 2016, many polls and pundits gave Mr. Trump little chance of winning, but his performance on Facebook was soaring, bolstered by millions of dollars in targeted advertising. His digital campaign director, Brad Parscale, later credited Facebook’s scale and influence with his victory.

Facebook is the most widespread platform, and for campaigns, it’s like broadcast television,” said Tim Lim, a Democratic digital consultant. “You have so much reach, and so many ad units, and probably more eyeballs than anywhere else.”

Democrats running for House, Senate and governor’s seats in this fall’s elections received a combined 15.1 million interactions on Facebook in the 30-day period, roughly three times the 5.4 million interactions received by Republican candidates.

Why it’s hot: we’ll find out this election day that to what degree we can link social media popularity to winning elections. Will there be a blue wave this election day?

Source

Nebraska: “Honestly. It’s Not For Everyone.”

The state of Nebraska is attempting to work its way out of its dead last position on the list of states that tourists are interested in considering for vacation through a new campaign which was revealed yesterday.

The Denver agency Vladimir Jones is giving the state a self-deprecating Midwestern spin with it’s new campaign; “Nebraska. Honestly, it’s not for everyone.” Nebraska is often overlooked as a fun and interesting place to visit but the campaign is hoping to point out plenty of those offerings in some of the creative. The state’s farmland, rivers, festivals and geologic parks are all featured in it’s quippy executions.

It’s a major shift from the previous slogan, “Visit Nebraska. Visit Nice.” The agency took a major risk as the approach could either be marketing genius or continue to solidify Nebraska’s built-in perceptions further. Reactions were mixed. Some shook their heads at the campaign while others felt it captured the state’s essence well.

Why it’s hot: Regardless of how well the campaign is received, it will turn heads and grab the attention of an audience that might have never considered the state.

https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/nebraska-snubs-its-haters-with-new-tourism-slogan-honestly-its-not-for-everyone/?utm_content=position_1&utm_source=sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=AW_Adfreak&utm_campaign=Adfreak_Newsletter_2018101816&s_id=59edf19472fbf2544c8b5862

Facebook Killed News

Seriously. Facebook killed news.

Facebook acknowledged in 2016 that it had been overstating to advertisers the average time users spent watching videos on the platform. But when exactly Facebook found out about that error—and how long the company kept it under wraps—is now the subject of a federal district court lawsuit in California. The suit, filed earlier this week, was brought by Facebook advertisers who allege that Facebook knew about the measurement error for more than a year before it was first reported publicly in The Wall Street Journal.

The current suit stems from an earlier, more narrow lawsuit filed in 2016, after Facebook admitted its error. The issue, which Facebook has since addressed, involved Facebook’s calculations for the average length of time a video was being viewed. Instead of dividing the total watch time by every user who played a given video, Facebook only factored in users who watched for more than three seconds. That yielded watch times that, the Journal reported at the time, were 60 to 80 percent higher than reality.

It was also around that time that many newsrooms across the country began laying off reporters, in what has become known as the “pivot to video.” Long story short, news rooms began to heavily invest in video, hiring tons of producers and content creators at the expense of firing journalists.

Why Its Hot

Would this have happened without Facebook’s ridiculously inflated video stats? Maybe. People do watch a ton of video on online even without Facebook. But when your business relies on advertising, and your ads are performing at the levels Facebook was reporting, you’ll probably think twice about who you’re hiring.

 

The Attention, Interest, Desire and Action Ad

      

 

Attention, Interest, Desire and Action- the  traditional marketing funnel defined by the traditional tactics to address each area. Each tactic is purposed to address one specific area of the funnel.

Enter Mobile Playable ads- while not a new initiative- they have been around since at least 2016- but can be more effective today with mobile usage at an all time high. Mobile Playable ads allow you to build an entire funnel within one ad type. They capture users’ attention with the promise of an enjoyable experience, build interest as users engage with the interactive ad spot and evoke desire and ultimately, action, with a strong call-to-action.

While playables are geared towards gaming apps- that doesn’t necessarily need to be their sole purpose. In fact brands could use this to promote apps or products.

Why it’s Hot?

Since every single user action in a playable ad is measurable, and nearly every aspect of the ad unit can be optimized to maximize performance- this is an ideal unit where clients are looking to maximize budget- and gather real time learning.

For brands like USPS-  Informed Delivery or the in-development Ship/Shape Ap. could be a good use of a Playable Ad. Creating an interaction and showing a practical use of a product/service can only benefit signups and or app downloads.

 

COALchella – coachella without the crowd

View image on Twitter

Think of it as all the fun of an outdoor music festival without the crowds—or the outdoors.

In late September, nearly 3,000 people logged on to their Minecraft accounts and got ready to party. The world-building video game has been often used to create larger than life sculptures, buildings, and artworks, but internet-collective Thwip Gang had bigger ideas.

After hosting a Minecraft-based “Birthday Party” for one of their members back in May, the Thwip Gang got to work organizing a full-scale concert completely within the gaming platform. With no more promotion than a few tweets on the organizers’ personal Twitter pages, Coalchella drew in 27,000 listeners over its 8 hours across various streaming platforms. (“Coalchella” because in Minecraft one mines coal, among other minerals. Just go with it.)

The free festival required nothing more than a Minecraft account to attend and drew some big name headliners like ANAMANAGUCHI and Electric Mantis. The musical lineup came together somewhat serendipitously—in an interview with the blog Melting of Age, one of Coalchella’s creators and Thwip Gang collaborator, Umru Rothenberg said, “It was a very random process of just asking whatever friends came to mind or saying ‘this person would be cool’ and checking if anyone was mutuals with them.”

After entering, festival goers arrived at the stage of their choosing — REDBLOCKS or BEDROCKS — and tuned into a livestream on the broadcast audio website Mixlr. Just like IRL, when the performer’s avatar took the stage, the crowd of block people burst into life and the music started. The digital attendees then started dancing and the in-game chat flooded with commentary about the concert.

Why its hot?
Comfortable co-existence with brands without them trying to be controlling:
As if a full-scale two-stage concert “venue” isn’t enough, the Thwip Gang also scattered brands and logos thoughout the virtual site. An IHOb restaurant, a giant Bass Pro Shops Pyramid, and an overhead IKEA blimp were among those featured. Only there was a catch: None of the brands knew their logos were being used for the event — they were mostly plastered around Minecraft as cultural touchstones.

“What will always be most important to me is…that [brands] are not influencing, openly or otherwise, what I am experiencing in any way,” says co-organizer Robin Boehlen, “We can coexist with brands without them becoming controlling.”

 

Do you know where there’s a bathroom?

Find a public bathroom can be difficult. Especially when you’re in an unfamiliar area. And even more so when you’re with a disabled person or disabled yourself.

Enter MoDE’s Restroom Map, a web-based app that allows people to plot the address of gender neutral or single occupancy public restrooms on a map so that others can plan trips around them. Created by David Nykodym and Christina Ingoglia, the app went live with Missouri-specific destinations in August and expanded nationally in September.

It is designed on Esri’s Crowdsource Reporter, a mapping platform hosted on ArcGIS, and allows users to add geographic markers that appear in different shapes and colors depending on the type of facility. There’s Unisex (orange dot), Family (blue diamond), Family with Adult Sized Changing Table (green star), and Other (yellow dot) for some spot that might have equally important but non-standard benefits.

So far, the public has designated 260 spots around the country. To expand the list, Ingoglia is in early discussions with several state public transportation departments to add their own rest-stop information.

Why its hot

This app solves an obvious problem that is actually a big issue for a lot of people. Able-bodied people find themselves running around looking for a bathroom, but imagine needing a very specific bathroom. It must be so frustrating. This app is such a simple design, relying on crowd-sourced data, with a familiar interface. I can see this catching on for anyone traveling, or even just in areas they know, whether they’re able-bodied or not.

Do you know where there’s a bathroom?

Find a public bathroom can be difficult. Especially when you’re in an unfamiliar area. And even more so when you’re with a disabled person or disabled yourself.

Enter MoDE’s Restroom Map, a web-based app that allows people to plot the address of gender neutral or single occupancy public restrooms on a map so that others can plan trips around them. Created by David Nykodym and Christina Ingoglia, the app went live with Missouri-specific destinations in August and expanded nationally in September.

It is designed on Esri’s Crowdsource Reporter, a mapping platform hosted on ArcGIS, and allows users to add geographic markers that appear in different shapes and colors depending on the type of facility. There’s Unisex (orange dot), Family (blue diamond), Family with Adult Sized Changing Table (green star), and Other (yellow dot) for some spot that might have equally important but non-standard benefits.

So far, the public has designated 260 spots around the country. To expand the list, Ingoglia is in early discussions with several state public transportation departments to add their own rest-stop information.

Why its hot

This app solves an obvious problem that is actually a big issue for a lot of people. Able-bodied people find themselves running around looking for a bathroom, but imagine needing a very specific bathroom. It must be so frustrating. This app is such a simple design, relying on crowd-sourced data, with a familiar interface. I can see this catching on for anyone traveling, or even just in areas they know, whether they’re able-bodied or not.

Amazon just opened a physical store in NYC that only sells certain types of products

 

Amazon just opened their first-ever 4-star store. It opened in SoHo in New York City.

And as the name implies, everything on its shelves has earned at least a four-star review average from Amazon’s customers.

The store sells: devices, consumer electronics, kitchen, home, toys, books, and games.

Amazon Prime members will pay lower prices than non-members.

Why it’s hot:

This is essentially a “customer curated” physical store from an e-commerce retailer.

It’s also tailored to local buying habits because it features products “trending around NYC” in addition to the 4-star + products.

More here.

Bose Creates First FDA-Approved Self-Fitting Hearing Aid

37.5 million adults report hearing issues without an aid. As the elderly population rises, this business is only going to grow. According to Markets Insider, the audio-aid market is expected to reach $9.78B by 2022, up from $6.9B in 2017.

Last week, the FDA approved the marketing of a new device, the Bose Hearing Aid, which can be used without assistance from a doctor. The Bose Hearing Aid is intended to amplify sounds for individuals 18 years or older with perceived mild to moderate hearing impairment (hearing loss).

The Bose Hearing Aid is controlled by a smartphone app, enabling patients to use, fit, and program hearing aid settings themselves — making it the first DIY hearing aid authorized for marketing by the FDA.

Why It’s Hot: The approval sent shares of traditional hearing-aid makers like William Demant, GN Store Nord, and Sonova tumbling 10%. Additionally, when one major company looks to diversify, its competitors usually follow. Meaning traditional brands could have an even tougher time cutting through the noise if other audio giants were to get in on the action.

domino’s strikes again…

Ordering in “zero taps”, ordering by tweet or text, ordering by voice assistant, now Domino’s has a new way to get your favorite order in a dangerously easy manner. “If this then Domino’s” is exactly what it sounds like. In collaboration with IFTTT, you can define moments when you might want Domino’s, and when those things happen, you can get a text asking to confirm if you want to order.

Why it’s hot:

Perhaps you’re not a fan of the food, but it’s interesting to see how Domino’s is using connected technology to prompt people to think of occasions when they might want a pizza. In an effort to expand the times when people order Domino’s, it’s just making it super easy and automated to have the option.

 

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What is Voldemorting, the anti-SEO phenomenon?

An article by Gretchen McCulloch in WIRED this week looks at the phenomenon of “Voldemorting” – or – choosing to use alternative words when referring to a certain subject in order to abstract it (much like “He Who Must Not Be Named” from Harry Potter).

Here’s an example of synonymous words hiding in plain sight:

“I’m so tired of all the bad news on birdsite.”

“Yeah, there’s just too much about The Cheeto.”

McCulloch cites this quirky internet habit to a paper from Researcher Emily van der Nagel, and describes two different approaches to this subversion of language becoming increasingly common on social media:

On one hand, internet users may choose an abstracted term in order to subvert the power dynamics of a subject or person they reject.  But interestingly, the tactic can also be used simply to evade brands, accounts, or users who may be highly attuned to a certain keywords. McCulloch writes, “Slightly different words make it difficult to find any particular one through search. While search engine optimization uses keywords and hashtags in a competition to make your post or website the most relevant, Voldemorting is the anti-SEO, the anti-keyword, and the anti-hashtag.”

WHY IT’S HOT:

As search algorithms have gotten smarter, and with it our increased ability to seek and find information, so to has the topic of every conversation to be traced. Voldemorting is the ultimate SEO-“dis”.

McCulloch wisely ponders, “What does it mean to be a human brain supplemented by the extended memory of internet search? This was a big question in the earlier days of the internet. Now, perhaps, we have an answer: It means that we can find things, but others can also find us. Cultural references that were once opaque are now easily cracked open for ingenious wordplay, and that same ingenious wordplay can restore a sense of local community by keeping our complaints within their intended audiences.”

SOURCE: https://www.wired.com/story/voldemorting-ultimate-seo-diss-resident-linguist/

Facebook mistakenly deleted some people’s Live videos

This time instead of exposing users’ data, a Facebook  bug erased it. A previously undisclosed Facebook glitch caused it to delete some users’ Live videos if they tried to post them to their Story and the News Feed after finishing their broadcast. Facebook wouldn’t say how many users or livestreams were impacted, but told the bug was intermittent and affected a minority of all Live videos. It’s since patched the bug and restored some of the videos, but is notifying some users with an apology that their Live videos have been deleted permanently.

The bug raises the question of whether Facebook is a reliable place to share and store our memories and important moments. In March, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg told congress regarding the Cambridge Analytica scandal that “We have a responsibility to protect your data – and if we can’t, then we don’t deserve to serve you.” Between that misappropriation of user biographical data, the recent breach that let hackers steal the access tokens that would let them take over 50 million Facebook accounts, wrongful changes to users’ default sharing privacy settings, and now this, some users may conclude Facebook in fact no longer deserves to serve them.

Facebook user Tommy Gabriel Sparandera provided TechCrunch with this screenshot showing the apology note from Facebook on his profile. It reads “Information About Your Live Videos: Due to a technical issue, one or more of your live videos may have been deleted from your timeline and couldn’t be restored. We understand how important your live videos can be and apologize that this happened.”

When TechCrunch asked Facebook about the issue, it confirmed the problem and provided this statement: ““We recently discovered a technical issue that removed live videos from some people’s Facebook Timelines. We have resolved this issue and restored many of these videos to people’s Timelines. People whose videos we were unable to restore will get a notification on Facebook. We know saving memories on Facebook is important to people, and we apologize for this error.”

Facebook made a huge push to own the concept of “going Live” in 2016 with TV commercials, billboards and more designed to overshadow competitors like Twitter’s Periscope. It eventually succeeded, with Periscope’s popularity fading while one in five Facebook videos became Live broadcasts. But in its blitz to win this market, it didn’t build adequate safety and moderation tools. That led to suicides and violence being livestreamed to audiences before Facebook’s content police could take down the videos.

Nowadays, most users don’t go live frequently unless they’re some kind of influencer, public figure, or journalist. When they do see something important transpiring, Facebook has positioned itself as the way to broadcast it. But if users can’t be sure Facebook will properly save those videos, it could persuade them it’s not worth becoming a camera man instead of a participant in life’s most interesting moments.

Why This is Hot:

Facebook has been under fire for privacy related issues, putting the platform’s data security into question. This latest issue furthers that narrative, leaving users constantly wondering what their next snafu will be.

 

WeRemit

Around 170,000 Filipinos working in Hong Kong spend their days queuing, completing paperwork and paying substantial remittance fees to wire money home to families.

Chinese tech giant Tencent created a service to transfer money across borders using mobile payment technology.

Named WeRemit, the service exists as a function on Tencent’s WeChat, mainland China’s largest social media, messaging service and mobile payment app. Filipino users can transfer money to the Philippines in under 10 minutes, free of charge.

Filipino workers in Hong Kong, many of whom work as domestic helpers, can also use WeRemit for instant cash pick-up from 7-Eleven stores, bank deposits and mobile wallet transactions.

Why it’s Hot

The global remittance business moves more than $600bn around the world every year. The industry has become a strategic battleground for Asian tech giants seeking to disrupt a business that’s traditionally depended on a network of banks, convenience stores and pawnshops.

The Southeast Asian countries are an important market, with a growing population of 600m people, many of whom don’t have bank accounts. The Philippines is among the world’s most common destinations for money transfers, receiving $32.8bn in remittances in 2017, according to the World Bank.

 

Design will kill marketing, says Ikea’s former design chief

Marcus Engman is leaving Ikea to run a consultancy that convinces companies to spend their marketing budget on what matters: design.

For the past six years, Marcus Engman has successfully made Ikea weird.

As the company’s head of design, he spearheaded artistic collaborations on tropical furniture and L.A.-inspired skateboards to push the reserved Swedish furniture giant out of its minimalist comfort zone. But Engman recently left Ikea to start a company of his own called Skewed Productions, as a partner of the design firm Doberman. Think of Skewed as a hybrid of design studio and ad agency–its goal is to create marketing moments for companies through product design itself. Instead of spending money on ad buys, Engman wants to teach companies to market themselves through their design.

“I want to show there’s an alternative to marketing, which is actually design,” says Engman. “And if you work with design and communications in the right way, that would be the best kind of marketing, without buying media.”

Why this is hot?

Every industry is being disrupted and challenged by new entrants, philosophies, and breakthrough models. Design is making its way into the marketers territory and should be kept on everyone’s radar.

A dog treat that doubles up as a selfie stick

To promote its DentaStix product, Pedigree in New Zealand created SelfieStix – a smartphone clipper which can hold one treat. Dog owners simply have to clip the SelfieStix on their phones and attach a DentaStix to take the perfect selfie with their pup.

To support the SelfieStix clip, they also created a standalone app which, using machine vision technology, recognises dog faces and puts filters on them.

The agency reports that, so far, across social platforms, the project has reached over 2.1 million interactions, 3.5 million engagements and a 24% increase in sales. One quarter of New Zealand’s dog owners redeemed a SelfieSTIX, making acquisition cost 12 times lower than the industry standard.

Why its hot
The DentaStix was, in many markets, perceived as being quite a functional product as opposed to other dog treats on the market. DentaStix was the thing you gave your dog to keep their teeth clean. The brief was to change the perception of DentaStix from being this functional product to something that is equally irresistible for dogs.