World’s first baby marathon

Babies can cover a distance of more than 3 kilometers per day, according to research by New York University. Taking this data, babycare brand Huggies decided to host a Baby Marathon to raise awareness of its products in South Africa.

Four babies, nicknamed Thunder Pants, Hurricane Thando, Racin’ Grays and Danger Boy, were tasked with roaming 21km around their homes. Their progress was recorded over seven days using custom-made fitness trackers.

Huggies covered the race in four online episodes. With a fake sports commentator narrating the action, the videos highlight the effectiveness of Huggies diapers as if they were sports gear. Viewers could find out more about the products, as well as the babies and their training regimes, on a dedicated microsite

The Baby Marathon resulted in a 28.9% increase in Huggies’ diaper sales. The campaign trended within 10 mins of launch for 9 hours and attracted 8.4 million views.

Why it’s hot?
Brings the sportswear performance psychology to baby products.
By showing babies as athletes, it breaks away from the usual diaper efficacy claims.

Source: Huggies, South Africa

Diesel vs. Deisel

Diesel opened a pop-up with a twist. The shop, called Deisel, was situated on New York’s Canal Street – a location famous for its knock-off stores that sell replicas of designer products at cheap prices.

The Deisel pop-up sold a range of hats, t-shirts, jumpers and denim pieces, all branded with the knock-off logo. Prices ranged from $10 to $200: much lower than similar products found in standard Diesel stores.

But what looked like a fake pop-up was a stunt by the brand, supporting its latest campaign, Go with the Flaw. New Yorkers who ended up buying from the Deisel pop-up got their hands on real, limited-edition pieces at knock-off prices.

Why its hot?
If you can’t beat them, join them. 
The counterfeit industry was worth $460bn in 2016, according to the International Trademark Association. The fake goods culture has become so prominent that fashion brands have started referencing it in their collections and marketing activations. In 2016, luxury streetwear brand Vetements launched an ‘Official Fake’ collection and sold it in a garage space in the outskirts of Seoul. Elsewhere, luxury fashion darling Gucci became Guccy for its 2018 spring/summer resort collection – again, a nod to the rise of knock-off culture

Bet on Whodunnit

France 3 partnered with an online bookmaker to offer viewers of crime drama La Forêt real-time odds on the identity of the show’s killer. Windows sporadically appeared on-screen during live broadcasts of La Forêt offering odds on a particular character being the show’s murderer. If a character behaved suspiciously, their odds would shorten; if they offered an alibi, the odds would increase.

Viewers could place their bets through a dedicated microsite, where they were given a set number of free credits (buying more credits was not an option) and the opportunity to spread these across as many as five bets during each episode of the six-part series. If they bet smart (by putting the most money on the right suspect when his or her odds were at their highest) viewers had the chance to win an iPad, a GoPro camera or a weekend break in a forest cabin.

The campaign attracted 76.2 million media impressions. A typical user spent 15 minutes interacting with Bet On A Murderer (63.5% of those were mobile users). The TV show also attracted a substantial audience: 13.4 million viewers over three weeks, an increase of 9.5% for the channel

Why it’s hot?
It gave people a vehicle to compare their instincts against others, turning a regular murder mystery into a game. So, essentially adding an additional layer of drama over an existing drama. At the crux of it, It’s not about betting but a way to get people to commit to watching a program live.

What you cannot see is more interesting than what you can see

Skittles will not be airing its Super Bowl spot during the game this year. Instead, the film will be revealed to one selected fan whose reaction will be livestreamed on facebook.

In a mock TV broadcast video, a presenter reveals that the lucky fan is California-based teenager Marcos Menendez. The brand will release four teaser videos in the run up to the event to encourage speculation about the film, but has no plans to release the final ad to the public.

Why its hot?
Reaction videos meet Cialdini’s scarcity principle, which explains one of the most fundamental theories about human behavior: people will always want what they can’t have.
And, I think in today’s world which is addicted to sharing content, its pretty ballsy to show it to just one person and broadcast just the reaction not the content.

Delivering the most good looking pizzas

Domino’s is using artificial intelligence cameras to ensure that every pizza made in-store is up to scratch. The Pizza Checker cameras take pictures of pizzas from above the kitchen cutting board, and an AI program assesses the pizza type, temperature, crust type, toppings, and distribution of ingredients.

The results are then sent to the store manager. A picture of the pizza is also sent to the customer (through Domino’s order-tracking website) along with a notification that tells them if it failed its assessment and must be remade.

At present, the AI camera is being trialled at one Domino’s restaurant in Australia, with plans to implement the system across the rest of the country in 2018. The Computer Vision Quality Management System was developed by Dragontail Systems and incorporates Google’s AI software.

Why it’s hot?
We’re getting closer to the live delivery movie we’ve always been curious about

Source: Thrillist

It’s not a marathon. It’s performance art

BMW partnered with running apps to give runners in the Shanghai marathon an artwork based on their performance data. It created digital artworks that turned runners’ pace and speed data into colourful cylinders and waves.

BMW partnered with running apps such as CoDoon, JoyRun and Rejoice, as well as a data artist Joshua Davis, to collect runners’ data and then present it as an artwork. Runners could interact with the digital artwork, by rotating it, to reveal more information. The imagery could also be shared on social media.

Why its hot:
Applied BMW’s positioning as the Ultimate Performance Machine to running. It doesn’t feel too forced or out of place.

Applied the insight from car customers: just like car owners are curious about their car’s performance, runners have the same desire to know about their performance

What BMW said:
‘BMW aspires to earn a place in running culture while staying authentic to their brand. So we asked ourselves, if cars and running have almost nothing in common how can BMW add value to the running experience? The simple truth was performance. BMW has a rich heritage using technology to enhance performance in everything they do and we thought, what if they could do it for runners? This was leap off point our creatives took and ran with’

Irresistible Pointless pre-roll ads

Ikea in Sweden ran deliberately dull pre-roll ads, which were between four and nine minutes long, on YouTube. The average view time of the ads was three minutes, despite the option to skip appearing after five seconds. Also, the agency also states that 39% of viewers watched the ads to completion.

The humorous spots provide viewers with a window into typical Swedish households where people are getting on with their mundane lives. In one four-and-a-half-minute spot, a young boy washes dishes and repeatedly tells viewers to skip the ad because there’s nothing interesting to see.

In another spot, this one almost nine-minutes long, a young couple is showing kissing on a sofa until one of the pair gets freaked out by the thought of pervert viewers spying on her, and we’re left to watch her boyfriend fall asleep on the couch.

All the ads also feature occasional flashes of product information about the furniture used in the scenes. They fit within Ikea’s Where Life Happens positioning.

Results: The average view time of the ads was three minutes, despite the option to skip appearing after five seconds. 39% of viewers watched the ads to completion.

Why its hot:
-We are attracted to rejection
-So boring that its mesmerizing
-Where most brands pray that the audience stays longer, Ikea wins attention by doing the exact opposite.

Source: Adweek

Lifetime label

Mimica Touch, is a food label that decays at the same rate as food. The Mimica label is filled with gelatine, which decomposes in the same way as packaged foods. The gel is calibrated to each product line using shelf-life testing data, and it also takes into account the temperature at which it is stored.

When new, the label is smooth. But as time goes by and the gel decomposes, it becomes bumpy to touch, signalling that the food is no longer safe to eat.

The Mimica Touch was developed with visually impaired people in mind. It is also easy to assemble, so that manufacturers can make the label – which consists of a plastic tray, gel and a lid – on site.

Why its hot?
90% of Americans prematurely threw away food because they misinterpreted sell-by and use-by labels as indicators that food had gone rotten and become unsafe. 

Source: Mimica Lab

The flying supermarket

German airline Lufthansa has partnered with an online supermarket so passengers can shop for groceries on their flight home and avoid returning to an empty fridge.

Passengers on long-haul flights can use Lufthansa’s in-flight internet, FlyNet, to access Rewe’s online delivery service and shop for groceries. Passengers can then select a delivery date and the food will arrive at their home (provided the address is in Germany) in a cool box. They are also planning to trial this in the US next year

The trial began on 1 October and will run until 1 December. For the first six weeks of the trial, the service will be available on long-haul flights to Düsseldorf, Frankfurt and Munich. In the second six weeks, the service will be available on long-haul flights that have those three cities as the final destination.

Why it’s hot
From plane to home at just the right moment. Not only they deliver to your home but you can choose the exact time you want it to be delivered to your address.

The idea came from a customer survey where people said they want duty free products to b delivered home


Ticket please. But I’m the ticket

Swedish train operator SJ Railways is equipping passengers with chips as an alternative to paper tickets. The system comprises a NFC (near-field communication) microchip and a smartphone app.

Each passenger is given a membership number, which is stored in his or her chip and monitored via the app. Once implanted, conductors can simply use their device to scan people’s hands and validate their journey.

The company started by trialling the tech with 100 of its loyalty programme members and reports that 3,000 travellers are now using the microchip system.

The innovation follows the news that Swedish co-working space company Epicenter gives members the option to use a chip implant rather than a plastic card to access its premises. ‘Some of SJ’s business passengers at Epicenter contacted us and asked about the possibility of using the microchip for the train journey.

Why its hot?
From screen to skin. So, let the bio-hacking begin:
According to World Economic Forum, implantable mobile phones will on the market by 2023. These devices will potentially be able to accurately track a person’s health, while also allowing them to communicate thoughts through signals. While this might seem far-fetched, SJ Railways’ chip system is an example of how brands could tap into the emerging human augmentation market in a way that is more acceptable to the public.

Source: Contagious

Dubai is building a mock Martian city

United Arab Emirates has announced that it’s building a 1.9 million square feet simulated Mars settlement. It will be called Mars Science City and will serve as home to interconnected domes housing various laboratories simulating the planet’s terrain. The team building the structure plans to use advanced 3D printing techniques and heat and radiation insulation to mimic the harsh environment of our neighbor.

Why it’s hot?
New start-up movement: The city will have labs to develop technologies that can provide future Martian colonies with food, water and energy.

Source: Engadget

Cliffhanger: Pop-up on the edge of a cliff

Climbers on the iconic Bastille in Eldorado Canyon deal with heavy winds, pouring rain and temperatures that can rise and fall by as much as 40 degrees in August. As prepped as they might be, they could likely use an extra layer or two on their way to the top of this picturesque mountain outside Boulder, Colorado.

Enter the world’s most remote pop-up, dubbed Cliffside Shop and manned from sunrise to sunset by a fellow climber handing out hoodies, socks and other gear to anyone who needs it. The price may be free, but it does require you to climb 300 feet to a shop that juts out from the sheer face of the mountain.

The pop up lasted for two days, and the campaign, includes a dedicated microsite where users can find more information about the material and shop branded gear.

Why it’s hot?
Give people what they need exactly when they need it, no matter where they are

Source: Adweek


A bodega to kill all bodegas


Called Bodega, this startup installs unmanned pantry boxes in apartments, offices, dorms, and gyms. It promises convenience, but also represents competition for many mom-and-pop stores. Bodega’s logo is a cat, a nod to the popular bodega cat meme.

Bodega sets up five-foot-wide pantry boxes filled with non-perishable items you might pick up at a convenience store. An app will allow you to unlock the box and cameras powered with computer vision will register what you’ve picked up, automatically charging your credit card. The entire process happens without a person actually manning the “store.”

Why it’s hot?
Other than the fact that it has angered all the mom and pop corner bodega lovers

The end of centralized shopping as we know it 

“The vision here is much bigger than the box itself,” McDonald says. “Eventually, centralized shopping locations won’t be necessary, because there will be 100,000 Bodegas spread out, with one always 100 feet away from you.”

Personalized Bodega Boxes
“By studying their buying behavior, we’re hoping to eventually figure out how the needs of people in one apartment building differ from those in another. We could customize the items in one dorm versus the next.”

The backlash:

Source: Adweek, Fast Company


Really uncool app

How can terrified parents of newly qualified teen drivers persuade them to drive safely? Toyota has come up with what could be an ingenious method — embarrassing them.

The brand’s new Safe and Sound App, not only blocks social media posts and incoming calls once they’re traveling over nine miles per hour, it automatically switches to playing their parents’ Spotify playlist once they break the speed limit or try to use their phone. And, naturally, parents are free to put as much embarrassing music on there as they choose.

The parents activate the app when the teen wants to borrow their car, and it syncs both parent and child Spotify accounts. The app uses Google Maps API technology to detect if they’re speeding, and when the young driver touches their phone or breaks the speed limit, the music they are playing through Spotify will suddenly cut out and their parents’ playlist will kick in instead. Only once the driver stops interacting with their phone or returns to within the speed limit will their own music resume playing.

Why it’s hot?
They used a human insight and turned it into a product – for teenagers, the threat of embarrassment is more severe than threat of injury

Source: Creativity

Greatest Ikea hack of all time?

Here’s how Ikea responded to the news that costume designers of Game of Thrones have been cutting corners, using Ikea rugs as pelts and capes for some of its extras.
In the show, the northern-dwelling Nightwatch, led by commander and king of the north Jon Snow, wear animal skins as to not freeze when winter comes. Instead of decking out the soldiers in real pelts, costume designers elected to take a trip to Ikea to buy Peta-approved Faux animal skin rugs.

Why it’s hot?
Real time reaction with an idea that is low cost and pulled together in a couple of hours

Source: The Drum

Smart luggage tag to get around in Amsterdam

KLM’s latest creative way to provide something extra for its passengers is a smart luggage tag that helps visitors to Amsterdam to get around the city. The airline’s agency, DDB & Tribal Worldwide Amsterdam, has developed a limited edition audio luggage “Care Tag” consisting of an offline GPS module and a speaker.

KLM aims to share not just the standard tourist tips, but helpful information like pointing out busy intersections with a lot of cyclists, where and how to lock your bike and when you have to watch out for pickpockets. There are also more lighthearted tips such as where to taste local food for free, where to see great street art or where to rent a bike or boat. The Care Tag comes with a USB charger so you can easily recharge it, and the audio works at two different volumes and was tested at many busy and noisy locations.

Why it’s hot
Whether you’re walking or cycling through the city, it offers the right tip at the right location at the right time.

Nightlight to notify retweets and emails

Aumi Mini is a new project on Kickstarter. It’s a USB-powered nightlight that connects to your Wi-Fi, and includes IFTTT support for getting into all sorts of automated shenanigans.

The exact sort internet events you’d like a nightlight to inform you of is, of course, entirely up to you. A few examples offered by Aumi include weather alerts, Wi-Fi-is-down notifications, and and smart home integration.

Why it’s hot?


When will AI outperform humans at work?

352 AI experts forecast a 50% chance AI will outperform humans in all tasks within 45 years, and take all jobs from humans within 120 years. Many of the world’s leading experts on machine learning were among those they contacted, including Yann LeCun, director of AI research at Facebook, Mustafa Suleyman from Google’s DeepMind and Zoubin Ghahramani, director of Uber’s AI labs.

Get the full research document HERE. Go to page 14 to get details on predictions

Not Hot: Amazon’s ironic patent

Amazon’s long been a go-to for people to online price compare while shopping at brick-and-mortars. Now, a new patent granted to the company could prevent people from doing just that inside Amazon’s own stores.

The patent, titled “Physical Store Online Shopping Control,” details a mechanism where a retailer can intercept network requests like URLs and search terms that happen on its in-store Wi-Fi, then act upon them in various ways.

The document details in great length how a retailer like Amazon would use this information to its benefit. If, for example, the retailer sees you’re trying to access a competitor’s website to price check an item, it could compare the requested content to what’s offered in-store and then send price comparison information or a coupon to your browser instead. Or it could suggest a complementary item, or even block content outright.

You can read the entire patent here.

Why it’s not hot?
Amazon’s patent also lets the retailer know your physical whereabouts, saying, “the location may be triangulated utilizing information received from a multitude of wireless access points.” The retailer can then use this information to try and upsell you on items in your immediate area or direct a sales representative to your location.

It’s the very sort of thing that Amazon itself protests. Amazon is among companies that signed ‘day of action’ against FCC’s planned rollback of net neutrality rules

Did Dove ruin its body image?

It starts with a cheesy line “Real Beauty breaks mold”. After years of encouraging women to love their bodies, Dove set out to give its plastic bottles a makeover. The idea: “Just like women, we wanted to show that our iconic bottle can come in all shapes and sizes, too”

They have rolled out six different shapes of Dove-branded plastic body-wash bottles. Each roughly correlates with a (woman’s) body type. There’s an hourglass bottle. A tall, thin bottle with smaller curves. A pear-shaped bottle. An even squatter pear-shaped bottle.

Consider this scenario. A pear-shaped woman has run out of body wash. She visits the local drug store, where she finds a display of Dove Real Beauty Bottles. To her chagrin, now she must choose between pear- and hourglass-shaped soap. She must also present this proxy for a body—the one she has? the one she wishes she did?—to a cashier to handle and perhaps to judge. What otherwise would have been a body-image-free trip to the store becomes a trip that highlights body-image.

Why it’s hot?
A lot of people have been offended by it but no one has been able to explain why. The jury is still out on whether it’s stupid or genius.

Anti-stream for the streaming world

Singer-songwriter Beatie Wolfe is using technology to try to recapture some of music’s old-school magic and physicality. For the launch of her new album Raw Space, Wolfe teamed up with Nokia Bell Labs and Design IO. Starting tomorrow, May 5, Bell Labs will be streaming 360-degree footage from its anechoic chamber — a room with no echoes, where a vinyl version of Raw Space will be playing.

The video will also include augmented reality animation created by Design IO, aimed at illustrating the emotions and ideas of the songs. Because some of the animation is generated in real time, it should look different each time through.

Why its hot?
The world’s first Live 360 Augmented Reality album stream. It’s her vision and the way she describes it is wha makes this project so beautiful
“I’d been really thinking about this idea of: What would the anti-stream for today’s streaming world look like?” Wolfe said. “And how could you kind of recreate that tangible component, all of the artwork that we’re currently missing out of that streaming experience, with this really pure sound — and bring that to life for today’s generation?”

Now there’s a dating app in Slack

The dating app Feeld, previously known as 3nder and commonly known as “Tinder for threesomes,” has just announced a Slack integration – “Feeld for Slack

According to the Feeld, the bot works like this — just open a direct message conversation with Feeld and @-mention someone you “have feelings for.” For them to find out that you did that, they’ll have to initiate a conversation with the bot and mention you. Otherwise, Feeld promises, your secret dies in Slack. It doesn’t mention how long the bot will wait for your crush to reciprocate.

Why it’s hot?
What could possibly go wrong?

Today, To die. Google home can recognize multiple voices

Google Home can now be trained to identify the different voices of people you live with. Today Google announced that its smart speaker can support up to six different accounts on the same device. The addition of multi-user support means that Google Home will now tailor its answers for each person and know which account to pull data from based on their voice. No more hearing someone else’s calendar appointments.

So how does it work? When you connect your account on a Google Home, we ask you to say the phrases “Ok Google” and “Hey Google” two times each. Those phrases are then analyzed by a neural network, which can detect certain characteristics of a person’s voice. From that point on, any time you say “Ok Google” or “Hey Google” to your Google Home, the neural network will compare the sound of your voice to its previous analysis so it can understand if it’s you speaking or not. This comparison takes place only on your device, in a matter of milliseconds.

Why it’s hot?
-Everyone in the family gets a personal assistant.
-Imagine how it might work in a small business / office
-Once it starts recognizing more than six voices, can every department have its own AI assistant?

Snap to Store

Snap is now giving advertisers a better idea of how effective their ads are at getting people to visit a specific store or see a movie with a “Snap to Store” tool that’ll help track just that.

Snap to Store initially launched for select companies, including Wendy’s, 7-Eleven, and Paramount Pictures. It lets advertisers know where users go after viewing a sponsored location-based ad. Snap explains that Wendy’s, for example, sponsored a geofilter for its jalapeño chicken sandwich that resulted in more than 42,000 people visiting the fast food restaurant over the week.

Why it’s hot
Snap tracks not only the user who took a photo with a sponsored geofilter but also which friends saw that photo and subsequently visited the store. The tool relies on users’ location data and a partnership with Foursquare to power its geofilters and figure out where users are at a given time.

Earth 2050

Kaspersky has created a map to help people “look back and look forward” simultaneously. Called Earth 2050, the map provides a fascinating glimpse at a future based on predictions from futurists, professionals and members of the public.

It shows groups of yellow and white hexagons, with yellow representing places where cities, objects, and events of the future have been visualised, while white hexagons show predictions without accompanying illustrations. Illustrations can be added by anyone, after being vetted by Kaspersky, and predictions take place in the years 2030, 2040 and 2050. The result is a collection of 360-degree views of cities across the globe showing concepts dreamt up by professional futurologists and designers.

Each city and experience is equipped with predictions from experts at Kaspersky, futurologists, and random site visitors. Predictions range from the believable (humans will live in buildings stocked with amenities so they’ll never need to leave their homes) to the strange (toilets will analyze our poop) to the ambitious (students will be able to choose what time they go to school, thanks to pop-up hologram teachers)

Why its hot?
-Brings diversity of predictions about the future of the world
-Predictions pose a nagging question – “is everything we’re doing today right or not?”
-A through-the-looking-glass effect that makes for an intriguing, if not dystopian, look into 2050.

I sat on my cat because of VR

Virtual reality can whisk you away from your life, but it doesn’t make the things in your life actually vanish. And sometimes that might mean you’re going to sit on your cat.

Katie Goode, the creative director of developer Triangular Pixels, has built a kind of harness for her cat that uses one of HTC’s Vive VR trackers. The tracker is a tiny, crown-looking device that you can attach to a mug, a toy gun, or any other object you may wish to see while you’re inside virtual reality. In Goode’s case, she wanted to see when her cat decided to randomly take a nap in the middle of her room-scale VR space, and so she stitched together what looks like a tiny backpack for her pet.

The result is that anyone wearing the VR headset can now see when the animal comes into the room.

Why it’s hot?
-Wireless VR trackers enable unlimited possibilities as you can bring real life objects into your VR world.. Now you can add to that saving lives of pets and even children

-‘I sat on my cat’ is a very popular search phrase. I would like like to see how long it’ll take to ‘I sat on my cat because of VR’ to join that list

Bike in disguise

Dutch bicycle manufacturer VanMoof found that it had a problem. As it shipped its products to customers, it found that they were arriving to customers damaged.

The damage reports were a major problem for the company because the street bikes that it manufactures are at the high-end of the market, and some are loaded down with delicate electronics like anti-theft trackers and electric motors. Plus, the company had set a goal to sell 90 percent of its bikes online by the end of the decade.

So, the company came up with a genius solution: print a graphic of a flatscreen television on the side of the box.

Why it’s hot?
A simple idea brought instant results. By making its shippers think that they were transporting flatscreen televisions, shipping damage dropped by 70-80 percent


Drone in your phone

The Selfly is a proposed smartphone camera case that doubles as a selfie-taking drone. The Selfly can also circle around a fixed person or object, guaranteeing a 360-degree view of your life.

To use it, simply pop off your smartphone case and place the drone where you want it to hover. You can see “pilot’s view” footage from your smartphone, which doubles up as a remote to avoid dreaded double-chin shots.

Why it’s hot?
-Its simplicity can hasten mass adoption of drones.
-The pocket drones concept is driven by our need to capture our life just like the movies and this makes it really easy to do that
-I saw some mini-drones at CES 2017, but nothing comes close to its convenience
-Plus, most smart drones cost $500, Selfly when launched will cost $100

Track your skin

Korean brand Nurugo has developed SmartUV so users can be more aware of their skin type. They have developed an app called SmartUV to help users be more aware of their skin type. To use the app a special UV camera sold by Nurugo has to be attached to the bottom of the smartphone.

By emitting UV light the camera is able to show skin problems that normally people don’t notice, or let users know of developing issues like sun spots or melanoma so they can treat them before it becomes life-threatening. It also allows users to see how effective their sunscreen is. It also tells you if you’ve missed a spot when applying sunscreen

Why it’s hot?
-Imagine how it can change our skin care shopping behavior
-What if you could get a daily skin report and getting recommendations on products accordingly. This platform can become a whole new marketplace for skin care products
-Maintain a skin diary to keep track of how your skin is aging to proactively take care of your skin

Play a duet with your computer

In need of a piano partner and don’t know where to turn? Look no further than Google’s new interactive experiment called A.I. Duet. Developed as a part of Magenta, an open-source project launched by Google last year, the program uses artificial intelligence to play a duet when notes are entered into a computer.

Simply using your keyboard (or a connected MIDI keyboard), the Duet program uses machine learning to understand notes that are inputted by the user, and responds in turn with a melody of its own based on those notes.

Yotam Mann, who coded the project, said that to teach the computer he played it different melodies as an example. The computer was then able to learn the relationship between notes and was even able to learn key and rhythm without the help of Mann.

Why its hot?
-So far we’ve had a very transactional relationship with AI. This one is more creative
-Many experts feel that Human creativity will remain as one of the last traits that cannot be replicate by machines. This might be a step towards teaching machines to be creative