Asking for gender identity or sex on forms

When asking for gender identity or sex on forms, it’s easy for designers and marketers, especially cis designers and marketers, to revert to binary options, or to conflate assigned or biological sex with gender identity. Luckily lots of people have written articles and guides to help with asking questions to help ensure that data captured is quality and that users feel confident in responding. Below are 7 tips for being more inclusive in gender forms from UX Collective writer Sabrina Fonseca.

  1. Give a reason for asking.
  2. Be clear about who is receiving this data for safety and privacy purposes.
  3. Make it optional or provide an “prefer not to say” option.
  4. Include options for “gender nonconforming”, “genderqueer”, or “questioning” responses.
  5. Ask for pronouns to make things simpler to parse, or just an open field.
  6. Allow for custom or complicated answers if you require more detailed information.
  7. Think about if it is really crucial to the information you are capturing.

Bonus: internationalization applies to questions of gender as well, as some cultures have their own labels and pronoun guidelines to follow.

Why it’s hot

Gender diversity inclusion is work. It requires thinking, training, researching, testing, testing, testing, iterating, and keeping up with labels. But it’s worth pursuing it as gender fluidity is likely to become a more and more widely accepted concept in our society. Trans & GNC people and their allies want to see organizations take action rather than just say they’re supportive. Accommodating for people’s different choices is part of that. So making a small change like this can be beneficial to your target audience, they will appreciate your effort and desire to listen, even if the first attempt is not perfect. – Sabrina Fonseca

Read more at UX Collective, HRC.org, and Mailchimp