Tesla 3: Look ma – no dashboard!

The Tesla Model 3 has been billed as a groundbreaking car. And in one respect, it is: It doesn’t have an instrument cluster.

Tesla

Although it is unusual to have the most important displays and controls on the left side of the screen instead of the center or right, keep in mind the screen’s location in the center of the car, to the driver’s right. A large speedometer is located at the top left of the screen, which turns red if you are speeding. Below that is a graphic of the car. When parked you can open the hood, trunk, and charging door. The navigation and music selection screens work much the same way you would expect in any other infotainment system, tablet, or smartphone.

One fan has put together a prototype that those in the know say is pretty true-to-form.

Voice controls are basic for now – e.g. “navigate to…” – but are rumored to be a big part of the next software upgrade.

Business Insider: The Tesla Model 3’s interior is a study in automotive minimalism

Why It’s Hot
It’s one of the more significant updates to car dashboard U.I. in a long time – it will be interesting to hear the usability feedback now that the cars are being delivered. It also marks a more aggressive step towards autonomous cars.

the ultimate convenience of the ultimate convenience store…

A company called Wheely’s has created Moby Mart, a 24/7, on demand, self-driving, drone and digital assistant serviced, all electric, environmentally friendly, grab and go, digital payment only convenience store, currently autonomously piloting the streets of Shanghai. Or, as they put it on their website – “It is the store that comes to you, instead of you coming to the store.”

Bonus non-product marketing demo video:

Why it’s hot:

It’s interesting to think about what the world could look like when a number of often separate technologies come together. This may just be a primitive attempt at imagining it, but imagine the ultimate convenience provided by combining a number of technologies individually aimed at creating convenience for people. Anything could be delivered to you wherever you are, without direct human assistance.

Getting People Comfortable with Technology

In collaboration with Oxbotica, the city of London is testing a self-driving shuttle that will ferry +/-100 people along a short route in an effort to show average people they can safely ride and share a space with autonomous cars.

The model being tested is designed to provide safe transportation in and environment which presents multiple obstacles (pedestrians crossing paths). Their goal is to find out how passengers react to the experience of being transported by a computer-run system. They also hope to gain insights on interior design and functionality.

Why it’s hot: 

  1. Not everyone has access ($$) to technology, but as it becomes more ubiquitous, everyone needs to be familiarized/comfortable in order for the technology to be widely accepted and implemented.
  2. As advertisers/marketers, we often face the challenge of getting consumers to adopt new technologies and have to find ways to familiarize people with changing tech (ike the cardboard VR glasses).