Delta encouraging travel… and love? #DeltaDatingWall

Delta Airlines is partnering with Tinder to make dating app dreams come true with their #DeltaDatingWall.

Delta Air Lines, with help from Wieden + Kennedy New York, has put scenes from nine exotic destinations on a wall in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, so that NYC singles can take selfies for their dating profile—looking like attractive jet-setters.

The printed photos on the wall, surrounded by cute illustrations by Andrew Rae, feature Honolulu, Paris, Los Angeles, Pisa, London, Mexico City, Amsterdam, Moscow, and Zurich. And while the selfie-takers might not have the cash to actually fly there, the work does celebrate the fact that Delta flies to the most destinations of any airline from NYC.

The #DeltaDatingWall will be up throughout the summer. On June 17, Delta, in partnership with Tinder, will hold a singles-centric event where you can actually get a proper photo taken next to the wall by a professional photographer.

Why its hot?

  • i-n-n-o-v-a-t-i-o-n
  • Not a traditional partnership but it works for their target audience
  • Delta and Tinder and hosting a singles event where people can get their picture professionally taken with the wallll……

Delta Painted Exotic Locales on a Brooklyn Wall for Singles to Snap Selfies Like They’re World Travelers

Can these 5 Brain Hacking companies give us immortality?

Brain-hacking? Kind of a Frankenstein term.

The human brain has 100 billion neurons firing away all day and night. Can they be channeled, stimulated or directed in some way that benefits society? No surprise, here comes Elon Musk and Neuralink. His and four other companies are all approaching the idea that human-machine interface can change everything — especially for those suffering neurological disorders, like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s Disease, these could be life transforming.

Here is Elon’s mission statement (and this site is a one-pager!): Neuralink is developing ultra high bandwidth brain-machine interfaces to connect humans and computers. Initially, the Brain Computer Interface (BCIs) will be used for medical research, but the ultimate goal is to prevent humans from becoming obsolete, by enabling people to merge with artificial intelligence — perhaps even avoiding death.

Sounds amazing…but what does it really mean? Basically, why is this hot?

First, because they all seem to be heading towards an even more grandiose vision; avoiding death. No joke.

Second, the four companies means the competition is real:

FACEBOOK: a few weeks after Neuralink was launched, they announced an initiative to “let people type their thoughts”. Imagine a child with autism, someone with a mental disorder, so many sufferers, being able to “speak” this way. The news reports say it will take two years for a prototype medical implant and is being developed in their top secret Building 8 facility.

KERNEL: Kernel plans to build a flexible platform for recording and stimulating neurons, with the goal of treating diseases such as depression and Alzheimer’s. 

EMOTIV: (Their home page says it all):

EMOTIV Mental Commands and SDKs makes our technology an highly effective Brain-Computer-Interface and can put EMOTIV at the center of the Internet of Things and the ability to control the world around you.

DARPA: Ok, the government, but still, they are investing in several companies to develop a device that will record 1 million neurons and stimulate 100,000 in the brain. DARPA wants it the size of a nickel. Since they ‘invented’ the Internet, I’d say they have a good chance of pulling it off.

I encourage you all to visit their web sites and learn more. After all, can brain hacking help us live forever? Or is it hype?

 

Gone In 6 Seconds

Australian retailer Myer hosted a flash sale using YouTube’s six-second pre-roll ad slots.

The 6 Second Sale ads feature more than 100 Myer products with discounts greater than those available in store and online by 5%. Viewers have only six seconds (the length of the pre-roll ad) to secure the deal being offered, with those that manage to click on the offer in time are taken to a pre-populated shopping cart on Myer’s site.

The campaign created using Google’s Vogon –  customization tool that lets brands create unlimited variations of the same ad by changing the text, audio or images. The targeting used in the 6 Second Sale ensures no YouTube user will see the same ad twice.

The 6 Second Sale is being promoted through Myer’s website, social channels, catalog and print.

Why It’s Hot

-It merges shopping impulse with a platform experience that times out in a very short amount of time

-Leverages scarcity to heighten the need to buy and drive sales

-Great example of a brand “hacking” a platform to drive a campaign

 

 

Warby Parker Just Made Getting A Prescription A Lot Easier

Usually, completing a vision test for new glasses requires a trip to the optometrist and the glasses store.  Warby Parker, which started out as a try-before-you-buy mail-order eyeglasses company, is currently looking to use devices you already have in your home to help you get a new pair of glasses without having to drive to a doctor. If you have an expired vision prescription, you can use an iPhone, a computer and about 12 feet of space to find out if your vision has changed since your last exam.

VIDEO HERE!

Why It’s Hot:

Warby Parker has been working on this technology since 2015, while other companies, like Smart Vision Labs, have found ways to use mobile phones for in-store eye exams in 2016. It is not a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam if your vision has changed since your last one, but those of us who just want to grab a new pair of frames based on a still-valid expired prescription can do so from the comfort of our own home.

A better way to fly?

Air New Zealand has partnered with Microsoft to begin beta testing HoloLens augmented reality headsets on flights to help their crews better serve their passengers.

Flight attendants using headsets on their faces might look really strange and scare little children, but the practical applications are pretty cool. Being able to know, for example, which passengers have dietary restrictions or are in a certain mood can enhance the customer experience.

Story on The Verge

Why It’s Hot

It’s hot because while this might not be a solution that gets mass adoption with every airline, it is nice to know that there is an airline out there that is trying to improve the travel experience (*cough* unlike United *cough*).

 

Beyond The Pill is moving to Game On!

Can conservative Pharma companies becomes Gamers? Although a large investment by Merck and AMGEN was announced several months ago, the repercussions are now being felt. This could help open up the long pent-up demand for innovation by Pharma manufacturers.

The investment news came last summer, as quoted in FierceBiotech: “Akili Interactive Labs, the Boston-based startup developing nonpharmacological therapeutics for various cognitive disorders like autism and Alzheimer’s disease, got an $11.9 million boost in funding, raising its total Series B proceeds to $42.4 million.” Basically, they use gamification to improve cognitive function.

Recently, the new Pharma and gamer partners announced their first accomplishment, EVO, the game:

The first game application for children with a cognitive disorder has proven highly effective. This gives the marketers a differentiating aspect to their Rx. Being a fact-based industry, this is big news.

Why is this hot?

  • The terms “Beyond The Pill” has become the industries code for “innovation” — trying to offer some technology or service to make their drug stand-out in the minds of doctors and consumers. “Innovation” is a word that is intensely frightening to most Pharma marketers. For several years, as more and more blockbusters (drugs with sales over $1 billion) become generics (70% of ALL drugs are now generics), Pharma has been haphazardly explored partnerships and technologies, but has often failed due to cultural entropy and conservatism in the C-suite. This is a first.
  • Change needs to come from the C-suite: $11 million is a lot of money, especially for an industry so conservative and ROI-obsessed.  Every company, even MRM-McCann clients, are looking for ways to engage patients from clinical trials through drug adherence — the entire product lifecycle.
  • I have been “selling” into one of our Pharma clients an Artificial Intelligence platform from a company that did Sgt Star on the U.S. Army site; we have had several meetings to try and issue AI as their Beyond The Pill strategy for launch of a new ADHD drug; this success with Akili may make that path easier.

Doctors media preferences…Social? Maybe. Print and email? Yes!

When  it comes to digital adoption, it seems a no-brainer; isn’t everyone engaged? No. A notable exception are medical professionals. Doctors and nurses (NP/PA’s) tend to lean towards the conservative — not only politically, but in terms of their digital adoption. A recent study by HealthLink Dimensions, an email list and Big Data firm, produced a study on their information-gathering preferences among 700 medical professionals.

Email may seems so…yesterday. Yet, 75% of NPs and PAs and 66% of MDs prefer email for communication regarding the following:

• Industry news

• Product updates

• Research opportunities

What device is favored for reading email? Specifically, almost 52% of NPs/PAs and 46% of MDs utilize mobile devices; while almost 53% of NPs/PAs and 51% of MDs use desktop computers to comb through their emails.

Social Media? They love their closed, private peer-to-peer communities, such as SERMO (600K doctors)

Per the survey, 66% of NPs/PAs and 63% of MDs don’t use social media to communicate with patients. Instead, only one-third of these medical professionals are active on social media – mainly Twitter, LinkedIn, SERMO and Doximity – primarily for networking with their colleagues and peers

Last is print: 50% of NPs/PAs and 46% of MDs frequently use printed materials provided to their practices

Why is this hot? As with all customers we strategically serve, their content consumption habits have a major impact upon our planning. Knowing this, we must always realize to be customer-centric is to not fall in love with a shiny media object or a cool platform…

  • Time is a critical factor for HCP’s which drive what they consume and how; with an average of less than 15 minutes per patient, you know when it is a mobile device, they are on the move, doing rounds, trying to solve problems in real-time; your content and experience should embrace that. So, snippets of content are smart when you want them to be consumed at POC (Point-of-Care); conversely, HCP’s often have to consume intense medical journals, clinical studies and dense scientific content, which requires a desktop or laptop
  • Using Performance/Analytics to see how your clients’ content is consumed by time and device provides an invaluable insight into content strategy; if you want it to be useful in the NOW, then snippets, mobile-first; if you want to provide deeper content, then plan for desktop, but always offer email/download functions to account for mobile

 

 

Facebook’s latest superpower: mind reading

So Facebook is developing a way for users to type and create posts with their mind. Not even your mind is safe anymore, Facebook wants it.

Stanford University researchers have already created a system that allows paralyzed patients type eight words per minute using only thought, although that is achieved via an invasive implanted electrode array.

Building 8’s provisions, it is claimed, will be entirely non-invasive, and optimize human function, for instance allowing people to type faster than they would physically, up to as much as 100 words per minute or more.

Even though this is decades away from being streamlined and super available there has been huge backlash from people in regards to ethical, legal, and social implications. It’s been reported that this type of technology may start out in the form of smart clothes, where smart clothes transit data.. instead of your mind.

Why its hot?

  • Aside from Facebook, only one other person is developing this type of technology. Elon Musk is creating his own brain-computer interface with a new venture called Neuralink.
  • When this technology becomes accessible, it will change everything. Who knows how many other companies will have developed similar device/tech.
  • How can we create strategies around this tech? How much data will be collected? So many questions…

Source: http://www.adweek.com/digital/facebook-is-working-on-technology-that-lets-you-type-and-control-vr-devices-with-your-mind/

Hey can that robot make me live forever?

Robots, nanobots, human-looking robots…the race is on. It’s not a race to market. It’s actually a race to immortality. The Japanese pioneered the robot development as early as 2005…with RI-MAN: 

But the evolution has gone much further and, like so many things, is accelerating.

As the author, Peter Nichol says on CIO.com: Medical nanotechnology is expected to employ nanorobots that will be injected into the patient to perform work at a cellular level. Ingestibles and internables bring forward the introduction of broadband-enabled digital tools that are eaten and “smart” pills that use wireless technology to help monitor internal reactions to medications.

Robotics for healthcare are classified in three main categories of use:

  1. Direct patient care robots: surgical robots (used for performing clinical procedures), exoskeletons (for bionic extensions of self like the Ekso suit), and prosthetics (replacing lost limbs).  Over 500 people a day loses a limb in America with 2 million Americans living with limb loss according to the CDC.
  2. Indirect patient care robots: pharmacy robots (streamlining automation, autonomous robots for inventory control reducing labor costs), delivery robots (providing medical goods throughout a hospital autonomously), and disinfection robots (interacting with people with known infectious diseases such as healthcare-associated infections or HAIs).
  3. Home healthcare robots: robotic telepresence solutions (addressing the aging population with robotic assistance).

Why is this hot?

  • Robotics, pioneered by the Japanese as early as 2005 (RI-MAN above) is fast moving to nurses with human features and AI ability to do Q&A. They are already in research and university hospitals.
  • While the 3 categories are a general framework, the nanobot itself crawling through your bloodstream, checking for cancer cells, knitting your arteries, oxygenating our blood, preventing them from hardening and causing heart disease.
  • For those of you under 30 who think your immortal, you may have a chance.

I leave you with a forward-looking TED TALK on this topic from January, 2017:

 

Snap to Store

Snap is now giving advertisers a better idea of how effective their ads are at getting people to visit a specific store or see a movie with a “Snap to Store” tool that’ll help track just that.

Snap to Store initially launched for select companies, including Wendy’s, 7-Eleven, and Paramount Pictures. It lets advertisers know where users go after viewing a sponsored location-based ad. Snap explains that Wendy’s, for example, sponsored a geofilter for its jalapeño chicken sandwich that resulted in more than 42,000 people visiting the fast food restaurant over the week.

Why it’s hot
Snap tracks not only the user who took a photo with a sponsored geofilter but also which friends saw that photo and subsequently visited the store. The tool relies on users’ location data and a partnership with Foursquare to power its geofilters and figure out where users are at a given time.

Our Next Item Up for Bid: Your Personal Data

Link

The broadband privacy rules created by the FCC last year and vigorously debated last night are in grave danger after the Senate voted to repeal them this morning.

The rules, which forced internet service providers to get permission before selling your data, were overturned using the little-used Congressional Review Act (CRA). This is now being called “the single biggest step backwards in online privacy in many years” by those that spoke out against the repeal as well as the co-creator of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, Sen. Ed Markey.

This is a big deal and a pretty bad idea for anyone even remotely concerned with privacy and limiting the already questionable practices of telecoms and ISPs.

Assuming that this resolution passes through the House, which seems likely at this point, your broadband and wireless internet service provider will have free reign to collect and sell personal data along to third parties. That information may include (but is not limited to) location, financial, healthcare and browsing data scraped from customers. As a result of the ruling, you can expect ISPs to begin collecting this data by default.

To play the devil’s advocate for a second, let’s assume there is some upside for companies in this deregulation: “You want the entrepreneurial spirit to thrive, but you have to be able to say ‘no, I don’t want you in my living room.’ Yes, we’re capitalists, but we’re capitalists with a conscience.” states Sen Ed Markey. But with the wireless and cable industries both operating as powerful oligopolies, consumers will be left with zero protection against price-gouging, no advocate for net neutrality, and as today demonstrates, far less control over their own data.

The broadband privacy rule, among other things, expanded an existing rule by defining a few extra items as personal information, such as browsing history. This information joins medical records, credit card numbers and so on as information that your ISP is obligated to handle differently, asking if it can collect it and use it.

There is Nothing Hot about this.

You can see the utility of the rule right away; browsing records are very personal indeed, and ISPs are in a unique position to collect pretty much all of it if you’re not actively obscuring it. Facebook and Google see a lot, sure, but ISPs see a lot too, and a very different set of data.

Why should they be able to aggregate it and sell it without your permission? Perhaps to gain competitive advantage or profit or to cull other aggregators, in order to better target ads or build a profile of you. The FCC thought not, and proposed the rule, part of which was rescinded by the new FCC leadership before it even took effect. *Sigh*

If consumers continue to lose trust in the platforms we employ to market our brands and begin to widely question their safety, security and data usage, we are in big trouble. We’re already challenged by a litany of brand safety concerns – bots, fraud, hackers, malware, viewability –  and solutions aimed to mitigate yet limit marketing effectiveness (ex. ad blocking) continue to gain momentum. While some of this is good digital evolution (flashback to needing a pop-up blocker just to endure an average online session), the lack of consumer trust quickly erodes to lack of brand trust and soon those left behind willingly (or unknowingly) allowing their data to be sold on the open market might not be the ones worth reaching.

ISPs can now sell your browsing history without permission, thanks to the Senate

Senate votes to allow ISPs to collect personal data without permission

Re-inventing the wheel, one house call at a time

Heal, an app for arranging medical house calls, is expanding nationwide. Currently only available in select markets of California, Heal is expanding and coming to New York among other markets. In the coming months, it’ll begin providing service to cities in New York, Texas, Florida, and Pennsylvania.

New Yorkers will now be able to use technology to do what our grandparents used to do when they got sick: request for a doctor to make a house call.

Story from Digital Trends

Why it’s Hot

It’s hot because it shows how tech startups can fill needs that industries have abandoned due to cost or changes in trends. Heal hires doctors who actually want to make house calls and their clients are people who don’t have time to schedule an appointment weeks in advance or to go to urgent care due to busy schedules.

Want me to dance? Code me

Hasbro is trying to teach kids to code in a unique way. They are launching a Belle doll that pairs with a basic programming app for iOS or Android. The doll teaches kids the fundamentals of coding all in the name of getting Belle to dance. Kids can program dance routines through Belle’s companion app

Whether your child is younger or older, this doll can help gear a child’s mind towards coding. For the younger kids, you can program Belle’s movements with a basic connect-the-dots mode, where the screen is filled with shapes that coincide with basic dance moves. When a child drags their finger across the shapes on the screen, in whatever pattern they choose, Belle dances in conjunction with the selected commands. For older kids, you can use the “block coding” mode where you can drag and drop moves and commands into a sequence for Belle to perform. The doll pairs over Bluetooth and relies on batteries for power. Belle costs $120 and will be available in the fall 2017.

While it won’t necessarily make them computer geniuses overnight, it will help them develop problem solving skills, give them an interest in how things work on a fundamental level, and likely increase a child’s interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)

Why it’s hot
More girls in STEM please – Girls have historically been far more likely to stray away from STEM education and careers. Women make up half of the total U.S. college-educated workforce, but only 29% of the science and engineering workforce. So, it’s encouraging to see toy companies making an effort to welcome more little girls into the STEM community.

Happy 37th birthday, “Easter egg.”

You maybe be surprised to learn that It’s been 37 years since a programmer defied the corporate culture at Atari and created the first “easter egg” (in this case, a secret room in a video game that displayed said programmer’s name).

The “easter egg” is, of course, a hidden message, or secret feature that over the years has become equal parts reward for insatiable fans and means for communicating.

Today, the idea of an “easter egg” has spread to other video games, movies, TV shows and beyond.  There are restaurants that feature secret items that don’t make it on their menu – in a way, I guess these are edible “easter eggs.”  Lest we forget that an MRM client featured one in an effort from this past holiday season.

Why is this birthday, or phenomenon is worth mentioning?  “Easter eggs” are one more way content creators can engage with consumers; part fun, part messaging, part interaction and part reward.  Look for more brands to utilize “easter eggs” as they look for new, innovative and interesting ways to engage with consumers.

(One last thing, if you were wondering what the material is for a 37th anniversary – it’s alabaster.  Purchase accordingly.)

 

 

Posted in CX

Mind control your Netflix

MindFlix is an experimental headband that lets wearers scroll through and select titles on the service with only their thoughts.

Wouldn’t it be great if Netflix could just read your mind and pick out the exact thing you were in the mood for? The technology’s not there yet, but if MindFlix is any indication, that future is not far off. During a 24-hour hack day, Netflix employees were tasked to come up with projects centered around the service. MindFlix is one such project, using a special brainwave-reading headband made by Muse, allows users to scroll through and select items the interface through simple head movements and thoughts. For example, once the wearer decides on what they want to watch, they simply think ‘play’ and the selection starts on screen. It does this by sensing back activity and linking it to pre-selected actions, making finding something to watch easier and faster than ever.

Source: PSFK

Why It’s Hot

We’ve been talking about Voice Recognition as a trend, but what about mind recognition? The execution here may be a little silly, but what about implications for health, emergency situations? Will there be a time where we have to recall that we used to have to touch things?

 

 

 

Marketing in the Age of Sensory Deprivation

For “Generation Selfie”, beauty is not skin-deep but as deep as a multitude of digital surfaces. When consumers are comfortable adopting multiple digital personas, the notion that “beauty is only skin deep” is being challenged by Molton Brown. The luxury brand, which makes 35% of its sales during the Christmas period, is offering this generation a unique blend of sensory-driven escapism.

As Molton Brown’s global vice-president of marketing, Beatrice Descorps is at the forefront of the reimagining of aspirational beauty in the digital age. The beauty market in recent years has focused on people’s need to be, as she calls it, “selfie-ready”. But there is now a shift, with beauty no longer existing within the confines of the screen. She says: “In a few years’ time, beauty will not be about how you look – it will be much more about well-being; it will be more sensorial.

Beauty will not be about how perfect the canvas is – it will be more about how you feel.

Sensory stimulation is clearly top of the agenda at Molton Brown’s heavily scented Regent Street store, which has all the hallmarks of a retailer in the key pre-Christmas sales period. The signs are everywhere: from the wash-basin centrepiece where consumers can try products to the background music, from visual merchandising to luxurious packaging. The shop’s window display is designed to transport visitors to Laponia – where Molton Brown’s new festive Fabled Juniper Berries & Lapp Pine range and the store’s scent originate from.

Digital theatre

Translating this sense of occasion and theatre, and the myriad of rituals that have built the brand in-store, into online spaces is a significant focus for Molton Brown. “Three years ago when I first joined the brand, we had a very transactional site. Now we are focused on not only having a very seamless customer experience but ensuring that the human experience is right,” Descorps says.

In practical terms, this has included introducing 24/7 online customer service (manned by real people as opposed to a chatbot) and revolutionising the online delivery process. The changes have even extended to teaching the online delivery team how to tie the Molton Brown knot on its signature brown bags. It’s an investment that reflects an attention to detail: packaging that signifies luxury and indulgence is often neglected in the online delivery.

In an era when consumers feel overloaded with images and information. Victoria Buchanan, trends analyst at The Future Laboratory, says we are living in an age of dulled senses. She says: “Constantly bombarded with images on screens and the hub of never-ending information that is the internet, people are beginning  to forget how to feel. In our quest to reconnect with our senses and our bodies – to be our optimal selves – we are also seeking blissful altered states, with consumers yearning for heightened sensory environments.”

Why it’s hot?

  • In an era where the expectation economy has completely shifted,  it is fascinating to see how brands are creating experiences that are more personal and intuitive.
  • It harkens back to the “new car smell” of a Rolls Royce. Since 2000, the brand has been scenting its car interiors to smell like a model from 1965. This scent is indelibly marked in the minds of customers, instantly recognisable when encountered again.

Moxy Boutique Hotel w/ the Social Heart of a Hostel

“A free-spirited place where you can do all that crazy fun stuff you’d never think of doing at home, together with likeminded spirits you’d otherwise never have met. It’s no place like home.”

Implications – As Millennial travel habits (think Airbnb) continue to redefine the hotel industry, many traditional chains are launching diffusion brands that offer simple, streamlined experiences at lower price points. This one is owned by Marriott but feels like a youth infused club.  Currently in 8 cities (check out the NYC one) it was designed by the world-renowned design firm Yabu Pushelberg. GET A ROOM!

http://moxy-hotels.marriott.com

 

Posted in CX

Growing Number of Americans want Telehealth

American Well ran a Harris Poll to 4,000 consumers in 2016 to ask them about their thoughts on telehealth. In today’s fast-paced, on-the-go world it’s not surprising that a projected 50 million Americans would switch to video visits vs. scheduling an appoint for an in-office visit.

50M Americans would switch their PCP to a doctor who offers telehealth

Telehealth is an important shift in how patients access doctors. 67% of consumers say they delay seeking medical help due to high costs, long wait times, and busy schedules. Consumers still are loyal to their own doctors but want to be able to access them more easily. As such 1 in 5 Americans who switch to a doctor who has telehealth vs. one who does not.

66% of Americans would be willing to see a doctor via video. The highest demographic that are likely to utilize telehealth? Parents with children under 18 and/or those between the ages of 45-54 at 72%.

The applications that patients want to apply to telehealth include:

  • Chronic care condition
  • Post-surgical or hospital stay follow-up
  • Middle of the night care
  • Elderly care
  • Prescription refills
  • Birth control

Why it’s Hot:

The impact of having easy access to healthcare professionals could be huge for Pharma. If patients have more touch points with HCPs and if they were less likely to switch PCPs, would adherence increase?

What would it mean for pharma marketers?

  • Need for increased HCP/Patient shareable digital resources
  • Patient Apps
  • Long Term- decline in HCP office hours? More limited salesforce access?

Staples Builds an Alexa-Like Easy Button

When people think of Staples, they often think of the office supplies retailer’s consumer-facing business. A go-to source during the back-to-school season, Staples sells everything from notebooks and pens to printers and ink cartridges.

But at Retail Big Show in New York, the National Retail Federation’s annual convention and expo, Staples’ head of growth and applied innovation Ryan Bartley said the company has a B2B component, too—one that offers print and marketing services to Fortune 100 giants and small and mid-sized businesses, alike.

Now, the retailer is introducing an easier way for B2B customers to order what they need when they need it—a concept it developed by partnering with IBM Watson and putting a new spin on an old marketing shtick: the Easy Button.

See video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpmvF8KPyag

Why it’s hot:

  • Faster actions and decisions that will satisfy a need for speed, whilst incorporating personalization
  • Over time this will improve operational efficiency for the business as the technology lessens the load on call center personnel (it will be interesting to monitor the short-term effect on these individuals however as the technology is rolled out)
  • Data will no longer be digested and discarded.

Bridging the CX Understanding Gap

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As customer experience (CX) continues to drive business transformation, we are met with a general lack of understanding around what and how to move forward. Forrester research revealed more than 60% of decision makers are still holding on innovation related to the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is CX. People expect connectivity; people expect effortless data integration that improves the way they move through the world. This is nothing to delay and “assess.” The CX winners lean in hard early. They experiment. They fail. They pick themselves back up and try again.  People more than welcome that now, they expect it.