Dove creates “Girls Room”, a web-series targeting teens

Dove launched “Girls Room”, a new online video series focusing on teen girls and their experience dealing with social media pressures, body image issues, and bullying.

Dove co-created the series with Lena Waithe, who is almost as well-known by her acting career as her activism (he’s been called a “queero” in 2018 for creating meaningful work that inspires and tells the story of queer Black people coming of age).

The series has just launched ahead of Women’s History Month which, a perfect time to elevate stories about the challenges of young women in today’s culture.

Dove’s strategic move to connect with today’s teens shows the brand is willing to invest and play the long game by nurturing these relationships early so that they can hopefully become top of mind for years to come.

Why it’s hot: Although Dove has promoted body positivity and “real beauty” for over a decade, they’re looking for newer and fresher ways to bring this message to life in a way that aligns with today’s teens and their mobile-first media consumption. When it comes to fighting body issues and anxiety, Instagram is today’s biggest culprit so creating a series fit for this medium and mindset makes perfect sense.

 

Coronavirus Researchers Are Using Technology to Predict the Viral Path

As Coronavirus fears spread and hand sanitizer and face masks fly off the shelves, the question is, how to we prevent and mitigate.

Researchers are looking to AI for the solution. “John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor at Harvard Medical School, built a tool called Healthmap after SARS killed 774 people around the world in the mid-2000s, his team built a tool called Healthmap, which scrapes information about new outbreaks from online news reports, chatrooms and more. Healthmap then organizes that previously disparate data, generating visualizations that show how and where communicable diseases like the coronavirus are spreading. Healthmap’s output supplements more traditional data-gathering techniques used by organizations like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The project’s data is being used by clinicians, researchers and governments.”

https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

https://healthmap.org/en/

Why it’s hot?

Data is magic! We need to use all the resources at our disposal to mitigate the effects of the epidemic.

How Facebook is Fighting Coronavirus

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has written a lengthy post on his Facebook page detailing the latest steps the company is taking against misinformation about the coronavirus virus on its platform. The latest steps include giving the World Health Organization (WHO) free ads on Facebook. As Zuckerberg says, “We’re giving the WHO as many free ads as they need for their coronavirus response along with other in-kind support.”

The idea here is that the WHO will be able to widely spread factual information about the coronavirus via a theoretically unlimited number of ads on Facebook. This means that factual information about the virus is more likely to show up in people’s feeds.

Zuckerberg also said that Facebook will give “millions more in ad credits” to other organizations that are working to spread factual information about the virus. Facebook’s coronavirus ad-giveaway comes after the company announced in January that it will remove posts with coronavirus misinformation and last month said it is banning ads that promise to prevent or cure the virus.

Besides the free ad initiative, Zuckerberg also announced that people who search for coronavirus on Facebook will now see a “pop-up that directs you to the World Health Organization or your local health authority for the latest information.”

Why its hot

Nice to actually see Facebook doing something good for a change