Monitoring Your Posts with Facebook Messenger

Comment guard is a bot that can be applied to organic Facebook posts. When someone comments on a post, they automatically receive a private Facebook message.

It’s a Facebook post-auto-responder that can be used to build relationships between brands and consumers based on the content in the comment. The consumer will only become a “lead” after they respond to the private message.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Business A creates a post about designer sneakers.
  2. User A responds to the post saying, “I really want these sneakers, I haven’t found them anywhere.”
  3. The bot scans the message for words like “want” or a phrase like “I want” and automatically sends the user information about the business and how they can acquire these hard to find sneakers.
  4. User A engages with the bot and a community manager can then take over the conversation and guide the user toward conversion.

Messenger Guard in action

Read more here.

Why it’s HOT

  1. It takes less stress off of the community manager to scan messages for potential leads
  2. Businesses can develop more 1:1 communication with users which leads to better brand recognition
  3. Adds more ROI to social media as a marketing channel
  4. Adds a new KPI for social media such as intent to purchase which can be measured by messages sent by the bot and clicks to the URL sent by the bot

Going Paperless in a Brick and Mortar

Lush is known for its colorful soaps and bath bombs, but the brand has consistently prioritized going green above all else—and its very first SXSW activation was no exception.

The brand set up its bath bomb pop-up to showcase its 54 new bath bomb creations using absolutely no signage. Instead, attendees could download the Lush Labs app, which uses AI and machine learning to determine what each bath bomb is with just a quick snapshot. “At Lush, we care about sustainability, and we wanted to take that same lens … and apply it to the way we are using technology,” Charlotte Nisbet, global concept lead at Lush, told Adweek.

Nisbet explained that three decades ago, Lush co-founder Mo Constantine invented the bath bomb when brainstorming a packaging-free alternative to bubble bath. (The new bath bombs are being released globally on March 29 in celebration of 30 years since Constantine created the first bath bomb in her garden shed in England.)

“But we were still facing the barrier to being even more environmentally friendly with packaging and signage in our shops,” Nisbet said.

Enter the Lush Lens feature on the Lush Labs app, which lets consumers scan a product with their phone to see all the key information they’d need before making a purchase: price, ingredients and even videos of what the bath bomb looks like when submerged in water. “This means that not only can we avoid printing signage that will eventually need to be replaced, but also that customers can get information on their products anytime while at home,” Nisbet said.

Why It’s Hot

The application sounds cool but is this a sustainable direction for more stores to take? As brick and mortar stores continue to struggle, we could see many start to experiment with ways to bring digital experiences to consumers already plugged into their smartphones in retail spaces.

Source: Adweek

Online therapy gaining traction

From Bustle:

In recent years, websites and apps that offer remote access to trained therapists have risen in popularity. The convenience of communicating with a therapist via smartphone and the relatively low cost are some of the drivers behind why people use these services; even the American Psychological Association recognizes online therapy as a resource on its site. Well-known platforms include BetterHelp, which matches users with an online counselor they can communicate with live via text, phone, or video starting at $40 a week, and Talkspace, which allows the exchange of text, audio, and video messages with a therapist beginning at $49 a week. Other platforms include MyTherapist and telehealth services available through employee assistance programs (EAPs). While these apps and services aren’t replacements for traditional face-to-face therapy, as the respective FAQs for BetterHelpTalkspace, and MyTherapist note, these platforms can help users get more familiar with their mental health.

Ashley Batz/Bustle

See this additional article in The Guardian for more. 

Why it’s hot: Patients say that therapy apps have been a cost effective way for them to gain judgement-free access to mental health care that they otherwise may not have even pursued, lowering the barrier to entry to address extremely common but often ignored issues. The convenience factor also plays a big role, as patients don’t have to worry about scheduling or getting to appointments, and can receive on-demand therapy when they need it – to cope with a loss, for example – or ongoing therapy for chronic mental health disorders like anxiety.

Twitter Places Focus on Media Over Text

Twitter is rolling out updates to it’s camera feature in an effort to increase media-sharing on the social platform. Up until now, the camera feature was buried in the tweet composer. Now it is available with one swipe left from the timeline.

This update doesn’t mean Twitter is launching stories, instead, the platform is making it easier for users to share real-time content that adds another layer to their conversations. Users can add their own text to videos and images, and Twitter will also recommend popular hashtags based on geographic location.

Why it’s hot: With Twitter’s reputation as a text-heavy platform, this update could change the types of content users are drawn to on this site. Users on each social platform typically engage with specific photography styles and imagery, but this precedent has not yet been set for Twitter. More media use will also make it easier for advertisers to place visual content on the feed.

Source

Woebot – Highly Praised App for Mental Health

AI counseling is the wave of the future. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy administered by a smart chatbot, via an app relying on SMS, has become highly popular and well reviewed. Woebot isn’t just the face of a trend, it’s a notable player in technology transforming healthcare.

Why It’s Hot

It’s not new. It’s better. The first counseling software was called Eliza. It was ~1966. Part of the difficulty was it required human intervention. Ironically, in 2019 when many believe a lack of human contact to be part of the problem, that void actually addresses a barrier in therapy. Perceived lack of anonymity and privacy. Sure therapist visits are confidential blah blah but people naturally have difficulty opening up in person. Plus there’s the waiting room anxiety. With an app, studies have shown that people get to the heart of their problem quicker.

Why it Matters

There’s a ton of demand for “talk therapy” and others. Human counselors can’t keep up. People wait weeks and months for appointments. That’s in the U.S. where they’re compensated well. In this On Demand age, that’s seen as unacceptable. Woebot, and others, address the market need for immediate gratification care. Another issue is cost. Therapy is expensive. Apps are obviously a solve here. No co-pay.

Obligatory Statement

All the apps remind users they’re no substitute for human counselors but they are helpful in reflecting behavior patterns and emotional red flags back to their users. At the very least, it’ll help you make the most of your next therapy visit.