Baby strollers that roll themselves (super safe)

Well thanks to technology we have a hands-free baby stroller to help alleviate some stress from parents.

The stroller is electronically engineer to move when the parents moves, keeping the stroller within close proximity.

http://mashable.com/2017/08/09/smartbe-intelligent-stroller/#8OEL1XDvbiqh

The stroller can…

  • Warm bottles
  • Rock from side to side
  • Play music
  • Be operated and controlled from a smart phone…

The project was funded in 2016 but has been delayed. Prices range from $399 to $3,199.

Why its hot?

  • Well first off … is this safe?
  • This is a great use of technology and design but is there a need for a hands-free stroller?
  • These were ordered by expecting parents. It will be interesting to see where the industry goes with advances like these and expecting parents.

 

Facebook Blocks Shares to Heather Heyer Daily Stormer Article

Facebook has taken Fake News head on this week. The Daily Stormer (a neo-nazi publication) wrote a disgusting article about Heather Heyer, the victim of a hate crime this weekend in Charlottesville.

Facebook has actively started removing shares of this article unless they condemn the piece in their post copy. This is a new move by the platform and an interesting one.

Why Its Hot:

Yes, Facebook is fighting hatred. But, Facebook has allowed partisanship to spread in our country and allowed falsehoods to remain that keep people from knowing what is true and false. This is a bit of a bandaid on a bullet hole, but props to Facebook for helping to fix what it helped to break.

It’s interesting how we will all start to take on false equivalency when not everything deserves to be shared.

Source: http://mashable.com/2017/08/15/facebook-deleting-daily-stormer-heather-heyer/#K06vVkFr6iqo

To Post or Not To Post: The Content Dilemma

Hyatt was about to launch a month-long branded content partnership with the Atlantic that revolves around themes of inclusion, understanding and the importance of coming together. And then Charlottesville happened and they hesitated…

The video was conceived around the story of civil rights leader Xernona Clayton, who 50 years ago was searching for a place to host the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Atlanta with Martin Luther King Jr. Not a single venue wanted to accommodate the organization until it happened upon a Hyatt Regency. Wednesday marked the 50th anniversary of the conference.

Hyatt isn’t the only brand to hesitate when it comes to releasing work that could be judged as politically driven. In March, for instance, brands like YouTube, Microsoft, Chevrolet and CoverGirl began promoting Muslim inclusivity through ads without saying they were political. Hyatt was among these.

On one hand, brands have to find a way to tap into the zeitgeist to connect with consumers. On the other hand, they must be wary of getting called out for taking positions in the polarized environment.

Source: https://digiday.com/marketing/hyatt-deliberated-scrapping-new-branded-content-work-charlottesville-riots/

Would you have gone forth with the campaign? 

Why it’s hot: 

  • As marketers and advertisers, we walk a fine line with messaging. What the audience perceives of your messaging, especially in these politically volatile times can make or break a brand.

 

What the eclipse can teach us about science

While people across the country are racing to find safety glasses and make last-minute travel arrangements, scientists are making other preparations. These are just some of the natural phenomena that will tested with the help of this week’s solar eclipse:

Einstein’s theory of relativity

Einstein’s 1915 theory says that massive objects should warp the shape of space itself by a noticeable amount. Something like the Sun should bend the light from the constellations behind it, making the stars look as if they’ve moved over a teeny bit.

 

Learning more about the sun’s corona

The sun’s corona, “the bright, high-energy plasma blasting off the Sun’s surface” is the source of space weather, as well as energy particles that “can cause wild auroras, harm satellites, or potentially even swap votes in voting machines should they hit electronics in the right place.” A special telescope, which blocks out most of the sun for the viewer, is used to observe the corona, but eclipses allow scientists to get more precise images of the corona itself. Scientists will be observing the corona from the ground as well as from hot air balloons.

Plant and animal behavior

Unexpected darkness in a plant or animal’s habitat could allow scientists to study their reactions. Many plants and animals behave differently in the run-up or wake of natural disasters, will they show any new behavior during the eclipse?

The effect on weather in different climate zones

“The eclipse will be passing over several different ecosystems, including forests, farmland, and prairies.” Professional scientists, as well as citizen scientists, are preparing to record the temperature throughout the eclipse in St. Louis and the surrounding area.

Why it’s hot

There’s still much about the world we have yet to learn, and a natural phenomenon like the eclipse gives us a unique perspective to measure and observe. It’s something to be excited about that isn’t horrible!

To see other experiments, and to learn how to set up your own for the eclipse, see the full article at Gizmodo

“URLs are UI”

Image of URL printed in local paper from Scott Hanselman’s post “URLs are UI”

Hey,

There are layers to this digital design methodology, man.

“URLs are UI” Jacob Nielsen said that back in 1999, when Google only had <1% of search volume.

18 years later, have you considered your URLs? This message is specifically for everyone who does not work in SEO: People still have to interact with URLs.

Maybe you tried to share something but couldnt get a direct URL? Maybe you were on Facebook, and were confused about how to copy a direct link to a photo, because photos are overlays for some reason? Maybe, as a commenter on Mr. Hanselman’s post points out, you wanted to buy something on Amazon. Maybe you wanted to buy:

Creative Hobbies® Synthetic Chalkboard With Unfinished Wood Frame, 4 x 6 Inch -Pack of 6 Chalkboards

How would you get there?

Oh:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EA85652/ref=s9u_cartx_gw_i3?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B00EA85652&pd_rd_r=NKCYZGPFYJXAPSJWR341&pd_rd_w=XrV6G&pd_rd_wg=yhyyn&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=GS69TAV1S481DHM1S4XF&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=f719e185-4825-42a4-9507-9df1a19229d6&pf_rd_i=desktop

So just think about your URLs.

Maybe your URLs could be something like the example that Mr. Hanselman uses in his article:

I love Stack Overflow’s URLs. Here’s an example: https://stackoverflow.com/users/6380/scott-hanselman

The only thing that matters there is the 6380. Try it https://stackoverflow.com/users/6380 or https://stackoverflow.com/users/6380/fancy-pants also works. SO will even support this! http://stackoverflow.com/u/6380.

Genius. Why? Because they decided it matters.

Here’s another

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/701030/whats-the-significance-of-oct-12-1999 again, the text after the ID doesn’t matter. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/701030/

This is a great model for URLs where you want a to use a unique ID but the text/title in the URL may change. I use this for my podcasts so https://hanselminutes.com/587/brandon-bouier-on-the-defense-digital-service-and-deploying-code-in-a-war-zone is the same as https://hanselminutes.com/587.

Why it’s hot

There’s lots of moving pieces when it comes to designing digital experiences. Sometimes the smaller ones get overlooked because the big sexy crunchy ones are all, THERE, but it’s important to remember the small persistent pieces that need love and attention too. Like URLs.

Article, and image from Scott Hanselman’s “URLs are UI”

 

Smartphones make you spend more frivolously

https://management.ok.ubc.ca/faculty/yingzhu.html

An assistant professor at the University of British Columbia with a specialty in consumer behavior found that people shop differently on touchscreen devices than they do on their desktop PCs.

On phones, people are more likely to spend money on indulgent, hedonistic things, like movie tickets and dining out. And on PCs, people prioritize more practical, utilitarian things, like furniture and haircuts.

“The touchscreen has an easy-to-use interface that puts you into an experiential thinking style. When you’re in an experiential thinking mode, you crave excitement, a different experience,” says the professor. “When you’re on the desktop, with all the work emails, that interface puts you into a rational thinking style. While you’re in a rational thinking style, when you assess a product, you’ll look for something with functionality and specific uses.”

Why it’s hot: Should brands or retailers place products differently according to the screen?

disney creates a magical bench…

…you could interact with pretty much anything your mind can dream up.

Disney Research developed a somewhat lo-fi solution for mixed reality that requires no special glasses or singularity type of stuff. Its “Magic Bench” allows people to interact with things that aren’t there, watching the action in 3rd person view, on a screen broadcasting them. It even provides haptic feedback to make it feel like the imaginary character or object truly is on the bench with you.

Why It’s Hot:

1) It’s a great example of technology enabling a physical experience without getting in the way. Historically, augmented/mixed reality required some type of personal technology like glasses/headset, or a phone. This requires nothing from the user but their presence.

2) It shows how Disney is using technology to create experiences that extend its “magical” brand into the digital age.

 

Instagram Inception

Instagram has released a new feature which lets users interact with the photos and videos messaged to them in private conversations.

If you receive a photo or video, you can take that photo and draw on it, and then respond back with that photo in your new photo. If you’re replying to a video, Instagram only saves the first frame for replies.

Apply a filter, draw on your photo, add stickers, write text, and send it back with the original message included. According to TechCrunch, if you’re watching a story, you can either send a text reply, or you can send a photo/video, adding context to when someone is replying to part of your story.

Read more here.

Why its hot

Instagram is giving you more reasons to stay within the app, messaging more with your friends. You can do more than just watch a story or reply to a message with another message. This is much more engaging, allowing users to actually interact with the messages themselves and include them in a fun way to tell an even richer story.

Really uncool app

How can terrified parents of newly qualified teen drivers persuade them to drive safely? Toyota has come up with what could be an ingenious method — embarrassing them.

The brand’s new Safe and Sound App, not only blocks social media posts and incoming calls once they’re traveling over nine miles per hour, it automatically switches to playing their parents’ Spotify playlist once they break the speed limit or try to use their phone. And, naturally, parents are free to put as much embarrassing music on there as they choose.

The parents activate the app when the teen wants to borrow their car, and it syncs both parent and child Spotify accounts. The app uses Google Maps API technology to detect if they’re speeding, and when the young driver touches their phone or breaks the speed limit, the music they are playing through Spotify will suddenly cut out and their parents’ playlist will kick in instead. Only once the driver stops interacting with their phone or returns to within the speed limit will their own music resume playing.

Why it’s hot?
They used a human insight and turned it into a product – for teenagers, the threat of embarrassment is more severe than threat of injury

Source: Creativity

Swipe Up for a Burger at Your Doorstep

Ever wish you could have that beautiful burger you see on Instagram… brought to you immediately? An agency out based out of Brazil (named Africa) is deploying a new social campaign for Heinz: ‘Irresistible Posts’ where they seek to make this possible.

In Sao Paulo, Instagram users who are searching the Stories section in the early afternoon receive a targeted video of a delicious burger prepared by a local restaurant chef. At the end of the video, the chef appears onscreen and tells the user to swipe up to have this exact meal sent to them. Once the user fills out their location details, the burger is brought to their doorstep. Where does Heinz come in? It is delivered in a personalized box created by Heinz – which conveniently includes several of their condiment products.

Heinz has not announced if they plan to expand the campaign outside of Sao Paulo.

See video!

Why it’s sizzln’ hot: Not only does this activation play upon the extremely relevant #foodporn Instagram trend, but this is a strategic play for Heinz. By being the behind-the-scenes partner that helps users fulfill their cravings (and add to them with their condiments), they are becoming a more relevant and reliable brand that provide more than just the add-ons. Additionally, next time these users think back to the best burger they’ve had – they will associate Heinz with that positive, memorable, and tasty experience.

Source: PSFK

Oscar and the design of healthcare apps

The design team behind Oscar started and ended their process fixated on the user experience. Many healthcare providers still send new customers stacks of paperwork for onboarding, and Oscar jumped wholly into online questionnaires, tutorials, and app. Over the iterative lifecycle, here are a few key learnings they found:

  • Like enterprise app design, healthcare apps should be seen as a consumer product (people don’t shed their skin and become mindless patients).
  • 87.8% of people who avoid early care do so because of bureaucracy, insurance issues, and price. Telemedicine is a glimmer of hope – connecting doctors directly with patients.
  • With healthcare apps, less is truly more. People tend to use healthcare apps rarely and often forget about them in between uses. The app needs to be more intuitive than innovative. Make it SIMPLE.
  • Test early and often using prototypes to course correct along the way.
  • The team was successful in limiting navigation buttons to give users a more guiding approach (forcing function).
  • They added CTAs for calling their doctor throughout the app at key touchpoints. This way, users understood WHEN they should be seeking help.
  • Getting users to spend LESS time on the app (meaning, they got what they needed and got off) became the goal. They needed to define success differently than other kinds of apps.

 

EASE: New Surgical App for Families

Clinicians at Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children developed a mobile application to provide real-time updates of surgical procedures to families in the waiting room. Surveys of patient families show improvements in patient experience, while nurses surveyed preferred the app over a phone call to families.

Source: http://catalyst.nejm.org/ease-operating-room-mobile-communication-app/

  1. The use of a mobile application to communicate in real-time from the operating room enhances the family experience and improves satisfaction.

  2. Physicians and nurses report that this method of updating the family is more efficient, reliable, valuable, and enjoyable than the traditional phone call.

  3. Communication is a vital component of the health care experience, and the surgical operating room has often lagged behind other areas in keeping families informed.

  4. The utilization of real-time text and visual updates with mobile technology is an efficient and effective tool that has been embraced by physicians, nurses, patients, and their families.

  5. Successful adoption and implementation of electronic communication requires a cultural change within an organization. Buy-in from executive administration, the legal office, the compliance office, and medical leadership is necessary.

  6. Adoption and implementation of innovations in health care can follow a phased process that identifies innovators to test the process and then allows expansion to occur organically.

  7. Providing enhanced communication has been shown to improve the patient experience and increase satisfaction scores and other valuable metrics.

In-App Survey of 2,500 patient recorded positive feedback for app:

  1. EASE reduced their anxiety: 98% yes
  2. Nature of the images received was appropriate: 99% yes
  3. The availability of EASE would influence your choice of hospital: 81% yes
  4. Satisfaction score (1 = very dissatisfied; 10 = very satisfied): 9.7 average score

Why it’s Hot:

As a digital-focused agency we have the ability to find these type of pain points and recommend/develop mobile solutions for our clients. The adoption rate on this product is skyrocketing because of how valuable and relevant it is to the user.

This new AR app lets you point and translate

Thanks to the recent release of Apple’s ARKit, front end developer Frances Ng has created a point-and-translate app. That’s right, simply point your phone at the item you want to translate and if the item is recognized, associated language options will display.

AR_Translation

Here it is in action.

Whether you’re looking to learn a new language in the comfort of your own home or in a foreign land looking for a helping hand, the app is a great example of often-too-rare AR utility.

The UX magic is possible through a combination of Apple’s ARKit and an existing database of about 1,000 learned objects that Ng ported into the app. While Ng says her app is just a demo and she has no immediate plans to take it to market, what’s so remarkable is that while companies like Microsoft spent many years and dollars on mastering object recognition, Ng was able to build her app in a weekend, simply because it’s building off so much past work that’s now freely available and baked into platforms like Apple’s.

https://www.fastcodesign.com/90136943/want-to-learn-a-new-language-with-this-ar-app-just-point-and-tap?utm_content=buffer58149&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Why It’s Hot

  • With the new AR development kits, we should definitely see a run of useful apps like this (as well as I’m sure lots of non-useful examples!)
  • It’s also an example of how more and more development is being done off of robust platforms increasing speed to market and standardizing patterns for fast consumer orientation
  • Money Can’t Buy (All) The Happiness

    People who say “money can’t buy happiness” have obviously never lived under a bridge. Money can buy happiness, certainly in the form of one’s safety, shelter, and food. So logically you could think

    “…if a little money buys some happiness…a lot of money buys a lot of happiness…I need more money to be happy!

    But unfortunately,  we as humans aren’t wired that way.  Research has shown that people have a base level of happiness built into their lives. As good things happen, and bad things happen we tend to slide back to that base level.

    I’m sure we have all gone through the phase of having to have the latest “thing”. We see it, we desire it, we literally crave it….then we finally obtain it. It feels great; then…we forget why we wanted it in the first place. Welcome to the Hedonic Treadmill

    Studies show that the difference in happiness from earning $5,000 a year to $50,000 a year is dramatic. This type of change allows one to purchase shelter, food, and security. But the level of happiness from $50,000 a year to $50,000,000 is nearly identical.

     

    Why It’s Hot

    So if it’s not stuff that makes us happy, what will? Experience. The time we spend with friends and family, the adventures we take, the people we help – these are the keys to moving your overall base level of happiness. Experience acts as a differentiator not only in life but also in the market. Brands and products who go beyond the physical good and offer experience will achieve more customer loyalty and find brand fans quicker.

     

     

    The Musician’s Mirror

    Poor posture is the leading cause of back and neck pain, especially for musicians who spend hours practicing. A Royal College of Art grad has designed a solution that gives audio and visual feedback to improve posture and technique while playing an instrument. The camera clip-on attaches to a music stand and provides video feedback to a device where the user can view their posture. The user selects examples of good vs bad posture and is given audio and visual feedback for their improvement.

    Watch the video below to see more about how this functions:

    Why it’s Hot: This device can no only reduce back and neck pain, but also is a good way to teach good techniques when learning an instrument. This can also be applied to other technique or posture based activities such as yoga or sitting at a desk. The type of feedback it gives is particularly well suited for musicians because they will be focusing on the sound of their instruments.

    Source

    Produce is War: How Driscoll’s Reinvented the Strawberry

    “Produce is war, and it is won by having something beautiful-looking to sell at Costco when the competition has only cat-faced uglies.” This lengthy New Yorker article recently dove into how Driscoll’s uses market insight and crop science to build their monopoly on the berry market.

    Strawberry from New Yorker

    “Driscoll’s focus groups have shown that millennials, adventurous and open-minded in their eating habits, and easily seduced by novelty, may embrace pale berries. With these consumers, unburdened by preconceived notions of what a white berry should look or taste like, Driscoll’s has a priceless opportunity: the definitional power that comes with first contact.”

    “According to Frances Dillard, Driscoll’s global brand strategist and a veteran of Disney’s consumer-products division, berries are the produce category most associated with happiness. (Kale, in contrast, has a health-control, “me” focus.) On a slide that Dillard prepared, mapping psychographic associations with various fruits, strawberries floated between Freedom and Harmony, in a zone marked Extrovert, above a word cloud that read “Social, pleasure, joy, balance, conviviality, friendship, warmth, soft, natural, sharing.” (Blueberries vibed as status-oriented, demanding, and high-tech.) As I studied the slide over Dillard’s shoulder in her office, she smiled tightly and said, “This is proprietary.”

    Why it’s hot: It’s pretty cool to learn how our favorite fruits came to be. I thought this was a cool case study in now market demand and consumer behavior drive product innovation and brand stories.

     

     

     

     

     

    Recommended: “A Piece of Work”

    Here’s a shameless plug for a podcast I really dig: Abbi Jacobsen’s new “A Piece of Work” podcast, a collab with WNYC and MoMA.

    Read more here: http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/a-piece-of-work-inside-abbi-jacobsons-new-art-podcast-w494252

    And listen to it here: https://project.wnyc.org/new-piece-of-work-moma-podcast/?gclid=CjwKEAjwoNrMBRD4-viTlaj42GcSJAD84Ni_ahV6_Nn_s1DD-4Ghu_OA8CVfaSjqxUpt4qPH1CZ5sxoCB-Tw_wcB

    WHY IT’S HOT:

    I appreciate A Piece of Work for the way it demystifies what fine art is all about. It’s incredibly accessible– even the curators she interviews are surprisingly unpretentious– which is so refreshing. Plus, her guests are great–  there is nothing not funny about Hannibal Burress talking about Duchamp’s urinal found art sculpture. As an Art History nerd I love it, but I recommend it because living in New York City it is easy to forget the incredible art all around us and A Piece of Work is not only a great podcast but a great reminder.

    Eliminated food waste with tech! Right on!

    I have two videos to share on this fine Friday morning and their about reducing food waste!

    The videos explain it all!

    1. http://mashable.com/2017/08/02/sustainable-indoor-vertical-farm/?utm_cid=sv-nextup-right#.N_PIdJh_qqM
    2. http://mashable.com/2017/07/18/spoiler-alert-cleaner-future/?utm_cid=sv-nextup-right#k5qAeHhJhsqD

    Why its hot?

    • People are always talking about how technology is “ruining” our social interactions and interfering with out lives, but this is using tech to better the planet.
    • Food waste is a huge problem that needs to be resolved if we want to survive as a species
    • Trip to grand central?!

    YouTube’s CEO Blasts Anti-Diversity Memo

    YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote a heartfelt letter detailing her dismay at the infamous Google Memo written by a now-fired Googler who cited bialogical reasons for why there are fewer women and minorities in STEM and tech.

    Yesterday, after reading the news, my daughter asked me a question. “Mom, is it true that there are biological reasons why there are fewer women in tech and leadership?”

    She notes that:

     I thought about the women throughout the tech field who are already dealing with the implicit biases that haunt our industry (which I’ve written about before), now confronting them explicitly.

    Why Its Hot:

    We’ve spoken about Uber’s “women problem” and its apparent across other fields. I think its just important to talk about diversity and acknowledge the problems that typically aren’t on the surface.

    Immersive Branding

    Google is redefining how we perceive the multiple “realities” we have been wrangling to understand to begin with by introducing Immersive Computing.

    On one end of the human experience, you have reality. Living, breathing, non-digital reality. It’s great. Usually. In the middle, as technology becomes more “immersive,” you have augmented reality. Basically, graphics start to float in front of your eyes on top of the real world–like a monster in Pokémon Go. Then, eventually, as more and more of these graphics are layered over your perception, you naturally segue into virtual reality. At the right end of the spectrum, all reality has been replaced with pixels.

    Basically, this is saying that the existing range of really distinct experiences or technological paradigms, aren’t different, but are all a gradient. And as technology advances and devices merge, immersive computing will allow us to pick and choose how much reality get (or don’t get). It’s the ability to dive as deeply (or shallowly) into the digital world as we’d like, at any time we’d would like, through glasses, or goggles, or a screen, or contact lenses…but preferably a Google device (Wink! Wink!)

    And it’s also a way for Google (and brands) to eventually be able to hack our perception at a moment’s notice…In gradients of course.

    Why It’s Hot:

    New interesting way to frame immersive technologies- one that is more palatable to general audiences

    • By consolidating all their “reality related” interface experiments under one tech genre, Google is positioning themselves as the leaders in the category
    • It’s also an indicator of where they are going to be taking headsets/glasses, and possibly Samsung’s contacts.

    Source:

    ‘Watch’ Out YouTube

    Yesterday, Facebook launched Watch, a new service providing live or recorded video content. It has only rolled out to a handful of users and would appear as a tab in Facebook’s mobile, desktop and TV apps. Watch showcases channels, called Shows, and currently features content from a limited pool of content creators, including Nas Daily, which features one-minute clips from around the world each day, and motivational speaker Gabby Bernstein.

    Perhaps most notably, Watch will feature a different game each week from Major League Baseball.

    According to The Next Web, “[Facebook] is funding some shows and inviting independent creators to sign up to the platform on their own as well; once they’re in, they’ll get a Show Page (similar to Pages for brands) that fans can follow and find clips on.

    For viewers, Facebook has included a watchlist that lets you save episodes to catch later; you’ll also be able to discover videos based on how people interact with them, in sections like “Most Talked About,” “What’s Making People Laugh,” (which includes shows where people have hit the “Haha” reaction button), and “What Friends Are Watching.”

    Why Its Hot

    Facebook may be out to eat YouTube’s and Netflix’s lunch, but will people want to spend even more time on Facebook? Of course, Facebook has a massive user base of two billion people monthly worldwide, and the eventual introduction of ads could attract major brands. This will come down to a question of quality. If Facebook can bring in major talent to produce content, combined with their user base, it could mean a real challenger for video king YouTube.

    Travel and work at the same time? Yes!

    Remote Year is a work and travel program that takes people who’re looking for personal and professional growth on a year-long journey to work, travel, and live in 12 different cities throughout the world.

    Participants are called “Remotes.” They will live and work in a different city around the globe each month. The program costs $27,000 with a $5,000 down payment followed by a monthly payment of $2,000 for the first 11 months. The costs include co-working spaces, accommodation, transportation, planned events and activities.

    Why it’s hot: To millennials, every experience is a self investment. They are willing to invest their money and time into experiences that help them grow.

     

    Your Perspective…is Biased

    People are fascinating creatures. We have the ability to create, communicate and con. Even when someone excels at “reading the room” they can only read what has been “written”, and what if that turns about to be a bit more fiction than truth?

    Empathy, especially through interviewing is a valuable tool in finding insight and inspiration. Both the interviewer and interviewee  play an integral part in the process.Those interviews can drastically change the outputs

    Why It’s Hot:

    I think the line “It’s like 6 totally different people” really captures how we as people can receive and process information. The lesson to take is – dig deeper. We’re all humans, maybe the person you’re interviewing is having a bad day, maybe they just won the lottery…without going in for a deeper dive we may miss the true essence.

     

    Smog Eating Bikes to Alleviate Beijing Smog

    Beijing’s smog condition is out of control, but design firm Studio Roosegaarde is up for the challenge of reducing or eliminating it.

    The anti-smog bicycles are expected to hit the Chinese city’s streets by the end of the year.

    Here’s how the bikes work: A device installed near the handlebars of the bike sucks in smoggy air and filters out particulates like soot or dust, clearing the way for what will essentially be a bubble of clean air right in front of the rider.

    The bikes are still in the planning stage, so their effectiveness has yet to be put to the test, but it’s possible that this air-filtration system could benefit more than just the cyclist who rides it. With Roosegaarde’s partner bike-sharing service Ofo providing access to over 6.5 million bikes in Asia and the U.K., a lot of air could end up running through those filters.

    (Source:https://www.good.is/articles/beijing-bicycles-remove-smog-directly-from-the-air)

    The design firm is known for creating other anti-smog tech. In 2016, they created a Smog Free tower, a 22 foot tall construction that can filter a million cubic feet an hour, with much of the particulate matter collected made into fashion accessories.

    Why it’s Hot: 

    • Outside the box thinking of enabling everyday items to help reduce pollution and help the environment is another way of tackling our environmental concerns that is accessible and feasible.

    Your Instagram Posts May Hold Clues to Your Mental Health

    The photos you share online speak volumes. They can serve as a form of self-expression or a record of travel. They can reflect your style and your quirks. But they might convey even more than you realize: The photos you share may hold clues to your mental health, new research suggests.

    From the colors and faces in their photos to the enhancements they make before posting them, Instagram users with a history of depression seem to present the world differently from their peers, according to the study, published this week in the journal EPJ Data Science.

    “People in our sample who were depressed tended to post photos that, on a pixel-by-pixel basis, were bluer, darker and grayer on average than healthy people,” said Andrew Reece, a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University and co-author of the study with Christopher Danforth, a professor at the University of Vermont.

    The pair identified participants as “depressed” or “healthy” based on whether they reported having received a clinical diagnosis of depression in the past. They then used machine-learning tools to find patterns in the photos and to create a model predicting depression by the posts.

    They found that depressed participants used fewer Instagram filters, those which allow users to digitally alter a photo’s brightness and coloring before it is posted. When these users did add a filter, they tended to choose “Inkwell,” which drains a photo of its color, making it black-and-white. The healthier users tended to prefer “Valencia,” which lightens a photo’s tint.

    Depressed participants were more likely to post photos containing a face. But when healthier participants did post photos with faces, theirs tended to feature more of them, on average.

    The researchers used software to analyze each photo’s hue, color saturation and brightness, as well as the number of faces it contained. They also collected information about the number of posts per user and the number of comments and likes on each post.

    Though they warned that their findings may not apply to all Instagram users, Mr. Reece and Mr. Danforth argued that the results suggest that a similar machine-learning model could someday prove useful in conducting or augmenting mental health screenings.

    “We reveal a great deal about our behavior with our activities,” Mr. Danforth said, “and we’re a lot more predictable than we’d like to think.”

    Source: New York Times

    Why It’s Hot

    The link between photos and health is an interesting one to explore. The role of new/alternate technologies (or just creative ways of using existing ones) in identifying illness — whether mental or otherwise — is something we are sure to see more of.

    Augmented reality without glasses

    Diagram of artificial lense

    Artificial lens diagram via techcrunch.com

    Six months ago, Omega Ophthalmics did a small trial of seven patients outside of the US. Their goal was to test for adverse effects of a surgery similar to lens replacements that often accompany cataract removals. The difference? Rather than replacing the cloudy lens with a normal artificial lens, surgeons instead implanted a lens that could be used for augmented reality, interactive sensors, or drug delivery.

    Why it’s hot

    Although widespread adoption of this technology is unlikely in the near future, scientists, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists hope that there is a market for such implants in an aging population that wants to be independent for longer. Whether this small trial is successful may pave the way for larger trials to test additional possibilities and risk.

    Learn more at TechCrunch.com

    Greatest Ikea hack of all time?



    Here’s how Ikea responded to the news that costume designers of Game of Thrones have been cutting corners, using Ikea rugs as pelts and capes for some of its extras.
    In the show, the northern-dwelling Nightwatch, led by commander and king of the north Jon Snow, wear animal skins as to not freeze when winter comes. Instead of decking out the soldiers in real pelts, costume designers elected to take a trip to Ikea to buy Peta-approved Faux animal skin rugs.

    Why it’s hot?
    Real time reaction with an idea that is low cost and pulled together in a couple of hours

    Source: The Drum

    R.I.P Cable

    Disney CEO Bob Iger announced that the company is ending its licensing deal with Netflix and will start offering Disney and Pixar movies on a Disney-branded subscription service starting in 2019. Iger also said that Disney is launching an ESPN OTT service.

    “This acquisition and the launch of our direct-to-consumer services mark an entirely new growth strategy for the company, one that takes advantage of the incredible opportunity that changing technology provides us to leverage the strength of our great brands,” said Iger.

    In the U.S. the new Disney app will be the exclusive, subscription video-on-demand home to upcoming releases such as the Frozen sequel, Toy Story 4, and the live-action version of The Lion King. It will also offer access to Disney’s library of TV shows and movies, as well as new, original Disney shows and movies that will be created for the service.

    The ESPN-branded, multi-sporting app, will launch in early 2018 and will include about 10,000 live games from major sporting leagues as well as collegiate sports. So far, there’s no word yet as to whether NFL or NBA games will be on the service. The new app is an “enhanced” version of the current ESPN app, which will continue to allow pay TV subscribers access to ESPN programming.

    Why it’s hot:

    This puts one of the final nails in cable’s coffin. Recent research states that declines for second quarter of 2017 came close to a million subscribers with Dish Network, DirectTV, and AT&T hit especially hard. This cannot be helping their case. However, this makes for a much better customer experience – providing their preferred shows and programs at their fingertips!

    Source: Fast Company

    Wearables and a Study That Could Change Healthcare

    Watch Video Here:

    https://www.joinallofus.org/

    The people who wear wearables have a chance to participate in a biomedical research project of epic proportion. The “All of Us” study from the National Institute of Health goes beyond the longitudinal standard to create an entirely new research infrastructure replete with a shared dataset for years to come. They are asking for a million volunteers to share a diverse array of personal information to help pave the way for personalized medicine.

    Why it’s Hot:

    As the public—and healthcare professionals—become progressively more comfortable with data collection, analysis, and sharing, opportunities in precision medicine and advanced research grow. By learning as much as we can from increasingly comprehensive and diverse audiences, the opportunity to provide the right patient with the right information regarding the right treatments also grows.

    Source: https://www.klick.com/health/news/blog/mhealth/wearables-and-precision-medicine/?utm_campaign=blog_promotion&utm_medium=klick_wire&utm_source=klickhealth&utm_content=mspitz_precision_20170714

     

    Tesla 3: Look ma – no dashboard!

    The Tesla Model 3 has been billed as a groundbreaking car. And in one respect, it is: It doesn’t have an instrument cluster.

    Tesla

    Although it is unusual to have the most important displays and controls on the left side of the screen instead of the center or right, keep in mind the screen’s location in the center of the car, to the driver’s right. A large speedometer is located at the top left of the screen, which turns red if you are speeding. Below that is a graphic of the car. When parked you can open the hood, trunk, and charging door. The navigation and music selection screens work much the same way you would expect in any other infotainment system, tablet, or smartphone.

    One fan has put together a prototype that those in the know say is pretty true-to-form.

    Voice controls are basic for now – e.g. “navigate to…” – but are rumored to be a big part of the next software upgrade.

    Business Insider: The Tesla Model 3’s interior is a study in automotive minimalism

    Why It’s Hot
    It’s one of the more significant updates to car dashboard U.I. in a long time – it will be interesting to hear the usability feedback now that the cars are being delivered. It also marks a more aggressive step towards autonomous cars.